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environment

286 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 286
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    Air Quality Management Areas in Highland Council area.

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    One of four component layer of the Scottish wildness map. This layer seeks to capture ruggedness: 'landform which is rugged, or otherwise physically challenging' (Annex 1 SNH policy statement). The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of ruggedness. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park.

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    There are many areas where the scenery is highly valued locally and local authorities often give these landscapes a local designation. This is to ensure that the landscape is not damaged by inappropriate development, and in some cases encourage positive landscape management. These designations play an important role in developing an awareness of the landscape qualities that make particular areas distinctive and promote a community's sense of pride in their surroundings. The names used for such Local Landscape Areas currently vary from one local authority to another. For example, they are termed 'Areas of Great Landscape Value' in Moray, 'Special Landscape Areas' in Dumfries and Galloway, and 'Sensitive Landscape Character Areas' in Ayrshire. Guidance published by Scottish Natural Heritage and Historic Scotland (see below) suggests the name be standardised to Local Landscape Areas (LLA) now. LLAs complement the National Scenic Area designation, which identifies those landscapes that are seen as nationally important owing to their unsurpassed scenery. http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-landscape-areas/

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    Beach areas are designated under the Bathing Waters Directive (76/160/EEC) to protect the environment and public health at locations where bathing is not prohibited and is traditionally practised by a large number of bathers. The Directive requires that water quality at all designated bathing waters must meet specific microbiological requirements in order to protect the health of those that bathe there. The waters are designated on the basis of significant use, taking into account varying population densities and visitor numbers. There are currently 86 site designations contained in this dataset.

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    Land is legally defined as 'contaminated' where substances are causing or could cause significant harm to people, property or protected species as well as causing significant pollution to surface waters (for example lakes and rivers) or groundwater. Land can become contaminated by a variety of substances, from heavy metals to agricultural waste. The environmental, financial and legal implications of this can be substantial. The management and remediation of contaminated land that, in its current state, is causing or has the potential to cause significant harm or significant pollution of the water environment, is regulated by legislation and underpinned by the core principles of the 'polluter pays' and a 'suitable for use approach'. Local authorities are the primary regulator for the contaminated land regime (SEPA also has certain responsibilities within the scope of the legislation) to regulate activities and assist in the management and remediation of contaminated land. Contaminated Land can go through remediation work and this dataset attempts to collect that detail. However, when a site has been remediated, it becomes suitable for the current use (at the time of remediation), and that this doesn't mean the site is 'clean' or has no contamination. Further assessment/remediation may be required should there be any change of use or new planning application etc. The current regulation regarding Contaminated Land is contained within the Environmental Protection Act (1990) known as Part IIA. Part IIA is further established in Scotland by the Contaminated Land (Scotland) Regulations 2000 (SSI 2000/178), as amended and the Scottish Government’s Statutory Guidance: Edition 2 provides the detailed framework for the definition, identification and remediation of contaminated land. THIS SPATIAL DATASET IS ONLY CONFIRMED (AND REMEDIATED) CONTAMINATED LAND AND DOES NOT INCLUDE 'POTENTIALLY' CONTAMINATED LAND.

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    Local nature conservation sites (LNCS) is a non-statutory designation given by local authorities to areas of locally important nature and landscapes. Scottish Natural Heritage, on behalf of the Local Nature Conservation Sites Working Group, published guidance (http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-nature-conservation/) for local authorities on the establishment and management of LNCS systems in Scotland. One of the LNCS working group's recommendations was that all local authorities should adopt the LNCS name in place of the many different local names. However, many councils still use alternative names for these sites such as Local Biodiversity Sites, Local Wildlife Sites, Local Geodiversity Sites and Sites of Interest for Nature Conservation. We have merged these all into this national dataset. Several LAs are still to confirm and digitise their LNCSs.

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    Tree Preservation Orders (TPO) are served by the council to protect individual and groups of trees which are considered of sufficient merit to warrant formal protection either for their contribution to the setting of the landscape/ built environment or where the tree itself is considered to be of interest either as an example of its species or of local / historic interest

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    Location and data on licensing and/or operation of known landfill sites within the boundary of the former Edinburgh District Council's administrative area. Details of landfills licensed after 1996 may be obtained from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency.

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    Local nature reserves are areas of (at least) locally important natural heritage, designated and managed by local authorities to give people better opportunities to learn about and enjoy nature close to where they live. They are found across the country, but generally close to towns and cities. More details are available here: http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/lnr/ Where we have not been supplied with data by local authorities we are extracting it from a previously produced SNH national dataset.

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    The Core Paths aim to satisfy the basic needs of local people and visitors for general access and recreation. They comprise a mixture of existing and some new paths. The Core Paths cater for all types of users - walkers, cyclists, horse riders, people with disabilities, and are a key part of outdoor access provision. The Fife Core Path Network is shown as lines, covering the whole of Fife, on the approved Core Path Plan as defined by a public consultation and public inquiry, as mandated by the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 that placesm,on the local authority, the duty to draw up a plan for a system of paths ('core paths') sufficient for the purpose of giving the public reasonable access throughout their area'. These 'core paths' systems will be available for recreation and everyday journeys by local people and visitors, providing opportunities for walking, cycling, riding and other activities for all ages and abilities.