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The Improvement Service

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    A Building Standards Register is maintained by local authorities under the terms of Section 24 of the Building (Scotland) Act 2003. Local authorities are responsible for granting permission for work to be done (building warrant) and for a completed building to be occupied (completion certificate). These registers are online and searchable and published as weekly lists in a similar way to planning applications. Registers typically contain details of applications at the following stages of the building warrant process: - Received - Decided - Commenced - Completed The datasets are presented as follows: 1. Building Standards - Weekly Lists (Points):  A point layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for all Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a local authority. This should be a complete dataset across Scotland using X/Y co-ordinates, UPRN or postcode as corresponding geometry. This is categorised by application status, local authority and date of weekly list. 2. Building Standards - Weekly Lists (Polygons): A polygon layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for most Scottish local authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a local authority. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online. This is categorised by application status, local authority and date of weekly list. 3. Building Standards - historic year layers (Polygons): Polygon layers for all previous year's building standards applications with summary details for most Scottish local authorities. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online and is not complete across Scotland. This data is collected and published weekly (for weekly lists) and this metadata record is updated weekly. *Moray's planning data has currently been removed from this dataset. We will find a solution to this in due course*

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    These strategies are a requirement that has now been added into the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/asp/2019/13/part/4/crossheading/forestry-and-woodland-strategy/enacted Most councils already have a FWS and these are normally accompanied by spatial data. Some of the strategies are produced jointly across Councils, e.g. Stirling & Clackmannanshire, Edinburgh & Lothians, Glasgow Clyde Valley. Generally, the FWS datasets contain similar attribution which identifies the FWS Classification, or the potential areas for woodland expansion. The attribution is usually along the lines of: Preferred, Potential, Sensitive, Unsuitable. Some of the councils have produced a few layers of data for their FWS which might apply specifically to woodland planting types, e.g. a separate FWS layer for native woodlands or for productive woodlands. Please note the data has been created using data of different scales (regional/local) and has been created as a high level assessment tool. The data should be viewed NO larger than 1:25000. Identification as a preferred area does not imply automatic approval of woodland planting proposals. Applications will be assessed based on site conditions. To be used in conjunction with the published supplementary guidance.

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    The One Scotland Gazetteer is an address database made up of all 32 individual local authority gazetteers. All addresses are created in accordance with the national standard for addressing, BS7666:2006 and the Scottish Gazetteer Conventions. Key features include: Spatially referenced address records, Property lifecycle details, Full compliance to the Scottish Gazetteer Conventions.

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    Community councils are required to be established by local authorities. They are the most local tier of statutory representation in Scotland. They bridge the gap between local authorities and communities and help to make public bodies aware of the opinions and needs of the communities they represent. Community councils are statutory consultees under various processes, such as for planning applications. There are many instances where polygons do not tessellate or snap to local authority boundaries. The Spatial Hub processing can correct for some minor gap errors (<5m) but not larger ones. Such gaps in the dataset mean that it cannot potentially be used for some kinds of spatial analysis e.g. point in polygon, because some point locations may fall within the gaps. These gaps either require amendment at source or approval for the IS to change.

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    A ‘polling place’ is defined as the building or area in which a polling station will be located. A ‘polling station’ is the room or area within the polling place where voting takes place. Unlike polling districts and polling places which are fixed by the local authority, polling stations are chosen by the (Acting) Returning Officer for the election. The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places. The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.

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    Tell Me Scotland is a portal for accessing public information notices issued by local authorities across Scotland. The site allows users to: - Search for public notices such as planning and licensing in an area - Check roadworks and restrictions on any chosen route - Search archived notices across the country - Register to receive alerts by text or email on notices in an area - Select an area on the map, or from the list below to view notices in that area This service is supported by an API that allows REST queries returning data in JSON or XML format. The API allows GET requests for notices in bulk, individually, by type (Planning, Traffic, General, Licensing and Councillor Surgeries) and also details and lists of organisations. The API also allows POST request for upload of notices by authorised users and organisations. In order to access the data via the API, a TellMeScotland account is required with REST read-only permissions and associated authorisations. https://www.tellmescotland.gov.uk/api/docs (for authorised users) https://www.tellmescotland.gov.uk (main website) To obtain a TellMeScotland account and associated authorisations, users should contact tellme@improvementservice.org.uk It is also possible to register individually for notice alerts, or to view the website as an unregistered user, but this does not allow direct access to the API.

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    A ‘polling district’ is a geographical subdivision of an electoral area such as an electoral Ward within which a polling place is designated. The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places. The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.

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    SGN create 4 separate data layers (by pressure tier) to depict the location of their gas network: LP - Low Pressure (19 mbar - 75 mbar) MP - Medium Pressure (75mbar - 2 bar) IP - Intermediate Pressure (2 bar - 7 bar) HP - Regional High Pressure (>7 bar) The gas network data is up to date at the time of publication, but it is given without warranty as to the accuracy of the information shown. Service pipes, valves, siphons, sub-connections etc. are not shown but their presence should be anticipated. No liability of any kind whatsoever is accepted by SGN or its agents, servants or sub-contractors for any error or omission. Should the user wish to excavate in the vicinity of pipelines, the User should visit SGN via sgn.co.uk/Safety/Dig-safely for further information. SGN use an on-line mapping system, accessible via the sgn.co.uk/Safety/Dig-safely web pages or linesearchbeforeudig.co.uk, this process should be used to obtain up to date maps and safety information before you excavate. However if you need more information please contact our Safety Admin team on 0800 912 1722 or by email: plantlocation@sgn.co.uk. For the avoidance of doubt, safe digging practices, in accordance with HS (G) 47, must be used to verify and establish the actual position of mains, pipes, services and other apparatus on site before any mechanical plant is used. It is your responsibility to ensure that this information is provided to all persons (whether direct labour or contractors) working for you on or near gas apparatus. Mains shown in the data are those owned by SGN by virtue of being a licensed Gas Transporter (GT). Gas pipes owned by other GT’s, or third parties, may also be present in the area and are not shown in the data. Information with regard to such pipes should be obtained from the relevant owners

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of data related to the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 and the new duties this places on local authorities. Part 5: Asset Transfer Requests: Provides community bodies with a right to request to purchase, lease, manage or use land and buildings belonging to local authorities. Local authorities are required to create and maintain a register of land which they will make available to the public. Part 8: Common Good Property: Places a statutory duty on local authorities to establish and maintain a register of all property held by them for the common good. It also requires local authorities to publish their proposals and consult community bodies before disposing of or changing the use of common good assets. Part 9: Allotments: It requires local authorities to take reasonable steps to provide allotments if waiting lists exceed certain trigger points and strengthens the protection for allotments. Provisions allow allotments to be 250 square metres in size or a different size that is to be agreed between the person requesting an allotment and the local authority. The Act also requires fair rents to be set and allows tenants to sell surplus produce grown on an allotment (other than with a view to making a profit). There is a requirement for local authorities to develop a food growing strategy for their area, including identifying land that may be used as allotment sites and identifying other areas of land that could be used by a community for the cultivation of vegetables, fruit, herbs or flowers.

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of all Scottish Community Asset Registers based (partly) on previous ePIMS submissions.