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The Improvement Service

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    Most councils will keep a record of their recycling and waste management facilities. Therefore we have tried to compile these into consistent national layers. Currently, we publish two layers: - Recycling Places (including locations of bins and centres) - a point layer (any provided polygons will have a centroid created) - Waste Management (including transfer centres and current/ historic landfill sites) - a polygon layer (any points will be buffered by 20m)

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    Many Local Authorities capture locational details of certain safety features located across their area of jurisdiction. This dataset attempts to pull those features together into one single national dataset. It currently contains defibrillator, water access points, fire hydrant, lifebelt and CCTV locations where local authorities have provided them. It is likely that this dataset will be superseded and/ or conflated into a national emergency services gazetteer as and when that is created.

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    Scottish councils usually divide towns and country areas into catchments and children living in a catchment area will usually go to the same local school. Domestic properties typically have a catchment area for each of their local: - primary non-denominational (PN), - secondary non-denominational (SN), - primary denominational/ Catholic (PD) and - secondary denominational/ Catholic (SN) schools. This dataset contains four separate layers (representing those above categories), which we deliver together as one single web service or zip folder.

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    Every local authority and National Park authority (access authorities) in Scotland is required to draw up a plan for a system of paths (core paths) sufficient for the purpose of giving the public reasonable access throughout their area. Core paths are paths, waterways or any other means of crossing land to facilitate, promote and manage the exercise of access rights under the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003, and are identified as such in access authority core paths plan. There are, intentionally, no set physical standards for core paths. This means that core paths can physically be anything from a faint line across a field to a fully constructed path, track or pavement. The National Access Forum, Scottish Natural Heritage and Scottish Government are encouraging information to be surveyed and made publicly available, in a nationally-standardised form, so that the public will know what physical type of route they can expect. Government guidance is making core paths the priority for rolling out this national standardised grading system information, which is set out at http://www.pathsforall.org.uk/pfa/creating-paths/path-grading-system.html

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    Development management is the name given to the process of deciding planning applications and various other associated activities including enforcement of planning controls. For the purposes of planning applications, development in Scotland is put into one of three categories – local, major or national. The different categories mean that applications are treated in a way which is suited to the size and complexity of the proposed development and the issues they are likely to raise. Most applications will be for local developments. Major developments include applications for 50 or more homes, certain waste, water, transport and energy-related developments, and larger retail developments. National developments are specific projects which have been identified in the National Planning Framework because of their national importance. Scottish Ministers become involved in a small minority of cases, but only do so where it involves a matter of genuine national interest. This dataset consists of 3 separate layers: 1. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Points):  A point layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for all Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This should be a complete dataset across Scotland using X/Y co-ordinates, UPRN or postcode as corresponding geometry. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list. 2. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Polygons): A polygon layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for most Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list. 3. Planning Applications (1996 - 2017): A polygon layer showing all previous year's planning applications with summary details for most Scottish planning authorities. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online and is not complete across Scotland. This data is collected and published weekly (for weekly lists) and this metadata record is updated weekly.

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    Land is legally defined as 'contaminated' where substances are causing or could cause significant harm to people, property or protected species as well as causing significant pollution to surface waters (for example lakes and rivers) or groundwater. Land can become contaminated by a variety of substances, from heavy metals to agricultural waste. The environmental, financial and legal implications of this can be substantial. The management and remediation of contaminated land that, in its current state, is causing or has the potential to cause significant harm or significant pollution of the water environment, is regulated by legislation and underpinned by the core principles of the 'polluter pays' and a 'suitable for use approach'. Local authorities are the primary regulator for the contaminated land regime (SEPA also has certain responsibilities within the scope of the legislation) to regulate activities and assist in the management and remediation of contaminated land. Contaminated Land can go through remediation work and this dataset attempts to collect that detail. However, when a site has been remediated, it becomes suitable for the current use (at the time of remediation), and that this doesn't mean the site is 'clean' or has no contamination. Further assessment/remediation may be required should there be any change of use or new planning application etc. The current regulation regarding Contaminated Land is contained within the Environmental Protection Act (1990) known as Part IIA. Part IIA is further established in Scotland by the Contaminated Land (Scotland) Regulations 2000 (SSI 2000/178), as amended and the Scottish Government’s Statutory Guidance: Edition 2 provides the detailed framework for the definition, identification and remediation of contaminated land. THIS SPATIAL DATASET IS ONLY CONFIRMED (AND REMEDIATED) CONTAMINATED LAND AND DOES NOT INCLUDE 'POTENTIALLY' CONTAMINATED LAND.

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    Under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 a local authority may determine which parts of its area are of special architectural or historic interest and may designate these as Conservation Areas. The public will normally be consulted on any proposal to designate conservation areas or to change their boundaries.There are over 600 Conservation Areas in Scotland. Many were designated in the early 1970s, but some have since been re-designated, merged, renamed, given smaller or larger boundaries and new ones have been added. They can cover historic land, battlefields, public parks, designed landscapes or railways but most contain groups of buildings extending over areas of a village, town or city. Further planning controls on development can be made by way of an Article 4 Direction, which may or may not be associated with a Conservation Area. An Article 4 Direction is not a conservation designation but an additional control within such areas. It is a statement made under The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Scotland) Amendment Order 2011. The Direction, made by a local authority and approved by Scottish Ministers, removes all or some of the permitted development rights on an area. The effect of a Direction is that planning permission will be required for specific types of development which would otherwise be regarded as 'permitted development', i.e. development that does not require a planning application. Directions can cover a variety of minor works and might include: the replacement of doors and windows, the erection of gates, fences, garages, sheds, porches, storage tanks or the installation of satellite antennae. This dataset contains Conservation Areas, Conservation Areas with associated Article 4 Directions, Article 4 Directions associated with a Conservation Area, and a small number of discrete Article 4 Direction areas.

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of licenced SEPA & some Local Authority Septic Tanks in Scotland. Under section 79 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and Under part 6, section 37 of the Water Resources (Scotland) Act 2013 SEPA, Scottish Water and Local Authorities all have a responsibility for the registration, management and compliance of Septic Tanks within Scotland. The Scottish Assessors also currently identifies 678 septic tanks. These are tanks that serve more than one dwelling. Those that serve just one dwelling may be treated as an appurtenance of the dwelling i.e. they are classified as domestic and treated as being reflected in the Council Tax band. SEPA have approximately a quarter of the Septic Tanks mapped as it has only been a requirement since 2012 that when buying or selling a house that these get licenced. Scottish Water have partial information (not included as data not provided in a suitable format) and Scottish Assessors collect some as well (not included due to percieved licensing restrictions). SEPA, Local Authorities, Scottish Water and Scottish Assessors are keen to combine data to create a complete and comprehensive view of all Septic Tanks in Scotland.

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    Local nature reserves are areas of (at least) locally important natural heritage, designated and managed by local authorities to give people better opportunities to learn about and enjoy nature close to where they live. They are found across the country, but generally close to towns and cities. More details are available here: http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/lnr/ Where we have not been supplied with data by local authorities we are extracting it from a previously produced SNH national dataset.

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    A ‘polling district’ is a geographical subdivision of an electoral area such as an electoral Ward within which a polling place is designated. The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places. The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.