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Scottish Natural Heritage

49 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 49
  • Categories  

    One of four component layer of the Scottish wildness map. This layer seeks to capture ruggedness: 'landform which is rugged, or otherwise physically challenging' (Annex 1 SNH policy statement). The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of ruggedness. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park.

  • Categories  

    Landscape Character Assessment (LCA) is a recognised technique which identifies areas with a distinct composition of inter-related natural, physical, cultural and historical characteristics. A National Programme of LCAs was initiated by SNH in 1994 covering 29 regional studies carried out with local authorities and other organisations. Although the broad methodology is similar for each study (i.e. carried out in accordance with published guidance), there is not complete consistency in the naming and describing of LCTs. The 2010 Loch Lomond and the Trossachs (LLTT) LCA dataset sits alongside the National dataset, and is captured at a higher resolution. This dataset should be used in conjuction with the LLTT LCA 2010 Report.

  • Categories  

    One of four component layer of the Scottishmap of relativewildness. This layer shows the level of modern artefacts (detractors)that are visible. The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of visual influence. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park. NextMap Digital Surface Model (DSM) gives the height of the surface including the detractors from which a viewshed can be produced. Viewsheds up to 15 km were created for 3 feature layersat 50m resolution, 1) Buildings and other structures, 2) Railway lines, roads and tracks and 3) Pylons and ski lifts. A fourth viewshed up to 30 km was created for wind turbineswhose heights were added to a DTM. The resulting calculations were then re-scaled 1-256 to produce the map of lack of built human artefacts.

  • Categories  

    One of four component layer of the Scottish map of relative wildness. This layer shows perceived naturalness of the landscape. The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of naturalness. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park. Each different land class is given a 'naturalness score' from 1 (low perceived naturalness) to 5 (high perceived naturalness). For example built up areas and gardens are scored 1, arable and horticultural land are scored 2, calcareous grassland scored 3, acid grass scored 4 and bog scored 5. A focal statistics window of 250m is passed over the dataset averaging the naturalness values to account for surrounding areas.

  • Categories  

    The purpose of this data is to indicate the relative wildness across Scotland. The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of wildness. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park. Four principal attributes identified in SNH's policy statement(Wildness in Scotlands Countryside, 2002), namely perceived naturalness of land cover, ruggedness, remoteness and the lack of built modern artefacts are mapped using GIS based techniques and a combination of readily available datasets. An index of wild land quality is then derived by combining the individual attribute layers. The attribute layers are given equal weighting.

  • Categories  

    Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) has prepared a consolidated spatial dataset of ‘carbon rich soil, deep peat and priority peatland habitats’ in Scotland derived from existing soil and vegetation data (James Hutton Institute 1:25,000 and 1:250,000 scale soil data and Land Cover Scotland 1988). The resulting Carbon and Peatland map updated earlier work undertaken by SNH for the identification of natural heritage features of national importance available from Scotland’s soil website. The map is a high-level planning tool to promote consistency and clarity in the preparation of spatial frameworks by planning authorities. The map is a predictive tool which provides an indication of the likely presence of peat on each individually-mapped area, at a coarse scale. The types of peat shown on the map are carbon-rich soils, deep peat and priority peatland habitat.

  • Categories  

    The data contains boundaries of Wild Land Areas in Scotland as determined by their level of naturalness, remoteness, ruggedness and lack of built modern artefacts. Boundaries should be considered as ‘fuzzy’ rather than definitive to reflect the transitional nature of wild land. It is an updateand replacementto the previously published Core Areas of Wild Land(CAWL)produced in 2013. Note that the areas have been renumbered sequentially and differ from those on the CAWL map.

  • Categories  

    This dataset provides an overview of the natural heritage sensitivity to wind farms. It identifies land with the greatest opportunity for wind farm development in natural heritage terms, and areas where natural heritage sensitivities indicate a medium or high level of constraint. The intermediate levels (Zone 3 high sensitivity - wild land search areas (hatched) and Zone 2 medium sensitivity (hatched)) indicate that the sensitivity does not apply to the entirety of that area, but only to a proportion. Zone 1 - lowest natural heritage sensitivity; Zone 2 - medium natural heritage sensitivity; Zone 3 - high natural heritage sensitivity. Further information can be found in the Strategic Locational Guidance for Onshore Wind Farms in respect of the Natural Heritage Policy Statement. This dataset was generated from the original vector data displayed in Map 5 available http://www.snh.gov.uk/planning-and-development/renewable-energy/onshore-wind/

  • Categories  

    This interactive map service contains the various categories of protected areas and sites in Scotland.

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    The National Nature Reserve (NNR) Partnership awards the NNR accolade to the best places for people to see the best of Scotland’s nature. SNH formally declares the Partnership’s recommended places under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 and the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.