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Land use

137 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 137
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    The Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Survey is a national data collection undertaken to establish the extent and state of vacant and derelict land in Scotland. The survey has been operating since 1988. This survey is associated with the Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Fund, under which cash allocations are made to local authorities. Every year the Scottish Government Communities Analytical Services produce a comprehensive national survey based on data collected and processed from all Local Authorities and Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority. The Spatial Hub takes this survey data and joins it (using site ID) to the polygon site information provided by local authorities. To create this dataset we have taken all of the spatial data provided by councils for the current survey year and combined it to this year's statistical survey (using the site reference). However: - where local authorities have not provided spatial data for the current year, we have used their previous spatial data return and matched the survey data as best we can, - where there is no spatial data at all for sites we have buffered the easting and northing provided in the survey, to create the rough polygon area for a site.

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    Development management is the name given to the process of deciding planning applications and various other associated activities including enforcement of planning controls. For the purposes of planning applications, development in Scotland is put into one of three categories – local, major or national. The different categories mean that applications are treated in a way which is suited to the size and complexity of the proposed development and the issues they are likely to raise. Most applications will be for local developments. Major developments include applications for 50 or more homes, certain waste, water, transport and energy-related developments, and larger retail developments. National developments are specific projects which have been identified in the National Planning Framework because of their national importance. Scottish Ministers become involved in a small minority of cases, but only do so where it involves a matter of genuine national interest. This dataset consists of 3 separate layers: 1. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Points):  A point layer showing an amalgamation of the current year's weekly lists for all Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This should be a complete dataset across Scotland using X/Y co-ordinates, UPRN or postcode as corresponding geometry. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list. 2. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Polygons): A polygon layer showing an amalgamation of the current year's weekly lists for most Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list. 3. Planning Applications (1996 - 2017): A polygon layer showing all previous year's planning applications with summary details for most Scottish planning authorities. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online and is not complete across Scotland. This data is collected and published weekly (for weekly lists) and this metadata record is updated monthly.

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    A survey issued by the Scottish Government to establish the extent & state of vacant & derelict land in Scotland. Local Authorities return data to the Scottish Government for checking.

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    This dataset portrays the boundaries of ‘Settlements’ in Scotland as at 2001 Census. There is widespread interest in statistics for the built-up areas in Scotland as most of the population lives in a built-up environment. When the former two-tier local government structure of regions and districts came into being in May 1975, the small local authorities known as large and small burghs were lost. However, Census users stated that there was a need to know the population (and characteristics) of built-up areas. There are 2 datasets which are designed to show the boundaries of ‘urban areas’ in Scotland: ‘Localities’ and ‘Settlements’. While “Settlements’ can go a long way in defining the towns and cities in Scotland, some are very extensive and have grouped together some very large populations. For example the settlement of ‘Greater Glasgow’ has a large population but no breakdown was given of the settlement into any constituent towns or cities such as Airdrie or Paisley. Accordingly, since 2001, the larger ‘Settlements’ have been divided into ‘Localities’ using as a basis the areas so designated in the 1991 Census report ‘Key statistics for ‘localities’ in Scotland (ISBN 0-11-495736-3)’. For the 2001 Census, NRS had developed a new process to identify ‘Settlements’ which were defined as: ‘A collection of contiguous high population density postcodes whose total population was 500 or more, bounded by low density postcodes (or water).’

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    This dataset portrays the boundaries of ‘Localities’ in Scotland as at the 2001 Census.. There is widespread interest in statistics for the built-up areas in Scotland as most of the population lives in a built-up environment. When the former two-tier local government structure of regions and districts came into being in May 1975, the small local authorities known as large and small burghs were lost. However, Census users stated that there was a need to know the population (and characteristics) of built-up areas. For the 2001 Census the method used to identify Localities was very similar to that used in 1991 in that it was based on identifying groups of high density postcodes.

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    This interactive map service contains the following Forestry Commission Scotland inventory and survey data layers:- - Native Woodland - Integrated Habitat Network - National Forest Inventory (NFI) - Native Woodland Survey of Scotland (NWSS) - Caledonian Pinewood Inventory (CP) - Pinewood Zone - Forest Reproductive Materials (FRM) - Regions of Provenance The layers can be switched on and off independently of each other. Forestry Commission Scotland would like to thank Scottish Natural Heritage for their co-operation in hosting this web service on behalf of FCS. PLEASE NOTE: In order to upload this Web Map Service into desktop GIS (eg. ESRI's ArcGIS), copy and paste the 'OnLine Resource' URL shown below up to, and including the '?'. ie:- https://cagmap.snh.gov.uk/arcgis/services/fcs_inventories_and_surveys/MapServer/WMSServer?

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    This interactive map service contains the following Forestry Commission Scotland administrative boundaries: - FC Conservancy boundaries - FC Forest District boundaries - Woodlands In & Around Towns (WIAT) - Central Scotland Green Network boundary (CSGN) The layers can be switched on and off independently of each other. Please note that the Conservancy and Forest District boundaries have both been generalised in order to speed screen refresh response time. Forestry Commission Scotland would like to thank Scottish Natural Heritage for their co-operation in hosting this web service on behalf of FCS. PLEASE NOTE: In order to upload this Web Map Service into desktop GIS (eg. ESRI's ArcGIS), copy and paste the 'OnLine Resource' URL shown below up to, and including the '?'. ie:- https://cagmap.snh.gov.uk/arcgis/services/fcs_admin_boundaries/MapServer/WMSServer?

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    This interactive map service contains the following Forestry Commission National Forest Estate data layers:- - National Forest Estate - Recreation Points - National Forest Estate - Recreation Routes - National Forest Estate - Recreation Areas - National Forest Estate - Roads - National Forest Estate - Bridges - National Forest Estate - Sub-compartments - National Forest Estate - Ownership - National Forest Estate - Legal Boundary - Galloway Dark Skies Park The layers can be switched on and off independently of each other. Forestry Commission Scotland would like to thank Scottish Natural Heritage for their co-operation in hosting this web service on behalf of FCS. PLEASE NOTE: In order to upload this Web Map Service into desktop GIS (eg. ESRI's ArcGIS), copy and paste the 'OnLine Resource' URL shown below up to, and including the '?'. ie:- https://cagmap.snh.gov.uk/arcgis/services/fcs_national_forest_estate/MapServer/WMSServer?

  • Categories  

    This dataset portrays the boundaries of ‘Localities’ in Scotland as at the 1991 Census.. There is widespread interest in statistics for the built-up areas in Scotland as most of the population lives in a built-up environment. When the former two-tier local government structure of regions and districts came into being in May 1975, the small local authorities known as large and small burghs were lost. However, Census users stated that there was a need to know the population (and characteristics) of built-up areas. For 1991 Localities, information on the area of a postcode was available from the digitised postcode boundaries and also on the postcode’s population from the 1991 Census. The method used to identify localities in 1991 was basically to classify a postcode as either urban or rural based on population density. Groups of urban (high population density) postcodes were identified where the number of residents in all the postcodes in the group was 500 or more. The final stage was to ask the local authorities to suggest any changes which might refine the boundaries of the identified settlements. This method identified 603 localities, 448 of which contained 1,000 residents or more, with the remainder containing a population of 500 or more but less that 1000.

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    This interactive map service contains a suite of Forestry Commission Scotland Grants & Regulations data layers (please see the Associated Resources list below). The layers can be switched on and off independently of each other. Forestry Commission Scotland would like to thank Scottish Natural Heritage for their co-operation in hosting this web service on behalf of FCS. PLEASE NOTE: In order to upload this Web Map Service into desktop GIS (eg. ESRI's ArcGIS), copy and paste the 'OnLine Resource' URL shown below up to, and including the '?'. ie:- https://cagmap.snh.gov.uk/arcgis/services/fcs_grants_and_regulations/MapServer/WMSServer?request=GetCapabilities&service=WMS