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    Woodland Creation forms part of the Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) 2014 - 2020. The SRDP delivers Pillar 2 of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Utilising some £1,326m of European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development funding, plus Scottish Government match funding, it funds economic, environmental and social measures for the benefit of rural Scotland. The SRDP is co-funded by the European Commission and the Scottish Government and reflects the 6 EU Rural Development Priorities. The programme also reflects the Scottish Government National Policy Framework (NPF). The aim of the Forestry Grant Scheme woodland creation category is to support the creation of new woodlands that will provide a range of economic, environmental and social benefits which include: - delivery of the Scottish Government target to extend woodland cover by an additional 100,000 hectares over the period of 2012-2022 - climate change mitigation by tackling greenhouse gas emissions through carbon sequestration - restoration of lost habitats through developing forest habitat networks - underpinning a sustainable forest industry by providing a reliable timber supply - protecting the soil and water environment - providing community benefits through public access - enhancing urban areas and improving landscapes - supporting rural development through local businesses and farm diversification A fundamental consideration when creating new woodland is whether or not the tree species is appropriate to the site. You should carry out an appropriate site based assessment of soil and vegetation to match species choice with the particular site. Forestry Research 'Ecological Site Classification' (ESC) decision support system helps guide forest managers and planners to select ecologically suited species to sites. ESC considers: windiness; temperature; moisture; continentality; soil moisture and soil nutrients. This helps to determine suitability of the chosen species to the site and identifies it as: poor; marginal; suitable or very suitable. In order to be considered for SRDP grant support the overall suitability for your chosen species must be either 'very suitable' or 'suitable'. As an initial first step in determining suitability, the polygons in this dataset represent the climatic suitability of the chosen tree species to the site. Climatic suitability, based on ESC uses the following climatic site factors: - Accumulated temperature - Moisture deficit - Exposure (Detailed Aspect Method Scoring [DAMS]) - Continentality NOTE: This datasets does NOT take into account any soils information. Any application that is identified on the map as being either 'unsuitable' or 'marginal' may still be considered - but only if you clearly demonstrate that the site is 'suitable' for the chosen species of tree (for example where there is localised shelter in an otherwise exposed location). The woodland creation category has nine options and the associated aims are: - 'Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is principally aimed at planting Sitka spruce. - 'Diverse Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is aimed at planting conifer species other than Sitka spruce. - 'Broadleaves' To create broadleaved woodlands on land that is suitable for sawn and prime timber and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). - 'Native Scots Pine' To create or expand native pinewood priority habitat (NVC) W18 - 'Native Upland Birch' The creation of native upland birch woodland of the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) W4: Downy Birch with Purple Moor Grass on shallow peaty soils. - 'Native Broadleaves' To create native broadleaved priority woodland habitats of the following National Vegetation Classification (NVC) types: W6 Alder with Stinging Nettle W7 Alder-Ash with Yellow Pimpernel W8 Ash, Field maple with Stinging Nettle W9 Ash, Rowan with Dogs Mercury W10 Oak (penduculate) with Bluebell Hyacinth W11 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bluebell/wild Hyacinth W16 Oak, Birch W17 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bilberry/Blaeberry - 'Native Low Density Broadleaves' To create specific native woodland or scrub habitats; including areas of ecotones for black grouse, treeline woodlands, juniper and other forms of scrub woodland and wood pasture systems. Normally associated with other woodland habitats in a transitional situation (eg. transition onto open hill: Black Grouse; Montane Scrub). - 'Small or Farm Woodland' To create small scale mixed broadleaved and conifer woodlands on farms and other rural land. - 'Native Broadleaves in Northern & Western Isles' To create native woodlands that contributes to the Orkney, Shetland or Western Isles woodland strategies. DATASET ATTRIBUTES: - Suitability - ie. 'Very Suitable', 'Suitable', 'Marginal', 'Unsuitable' or 'Inland Water'

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    Scotland’s woodlands and forests are a vital national resource and play an important role in rural development and sustainable land use. As well as helping to reduce the impacts of climate change and providing timber for industry, our forests enhance and protect the environment and provide opportunities for public enjoyment. The Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS) will support: - the creation of new woodlands, contributing towards the Scottish Government target of over 10,000 hectares of new woodlands per year - the sustainable management of existing woodlands WIG WIAT FOOTPATHS ==================== This option aims to provide support for operations that will contribute to the sustainable management of urban woodlands and provide a range of public benefits. Urban woodlands are those located within one kilometer of settlements with a population of over 2000 people. Support will be provided for applications that can: - bring neglected woodlands into management - develop opportunities to use and enjoy existing and newly created woodlands - enhance woodland sites supported under previous programmes This dataset identifies new and upgraded footpaths grant aided under the FGS WIG WIAT Option.

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    Forest Plans aim to deliver long-term environmental benefits through sustainable forest management and consists of a strategic plan describing the major forest operations over a 20 year period. RDC Forest Plans were closed to new applications in 2012, but the dataset is still updated in terms of boundary changes to felling phases and LISS. Support was given to help prepare a Forest Plan through the SRDP's Woodland Improvement Grant (WIG) for long-term forest planning. An approved Forest Plan gave a 10 year approval for felling, thinning and provided the means of accessing grants for restructuring felling and regeneration and other grant support through Rural Development Contracts - Rural Priorities. This dataset stores information on the Forest Plan boundary, the 1st and 2nd clearfell phases (1-5 years and 6-10 years) and areas managed under Low Impact Silvicultural Systems (LISS). Basic attribute information is captured during the digitising process. This is subsequently joined to more comprehensive information which is entered in an Excel spreadsheet by Conservancy staff. Attributes ======= Case_No : RDC Case Reference Number. GIS_Area : Area generated from spatial data capture Descriptor: Description of the spatial feature Fell_Start: Start year of felling phase. Fell_End: End year of felling phase. Local_Auth: Local Authority RPAC: Regional Proposal Assessment Committee Cons_Name: Conservancy Grid_Ref: National Grid Reference Claim_Area: Area claimed for the Forest Plan. This only applies to the FP Boundary Cont_Start : Date of Approval Cont_End : Contract end date.

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    Management Plans provide a simpler alternative to Forest Plans for woodlands under 100 hectares. They are required as part of the eligibility criteria for SRDP grants. However no grant payments are available for the preperation of Management Plans. The Management Plan must give a clear and concise description of the woodland and the indicative management proposals for 5 years. These must be in accordance with the principles of sustainable forest management as defined by the UK Forestry Standard. Basic attribute information is captured during the digitising process. This is subsequently joined to more comprehensive information which is entered in an Excel spreadsheet by Conservancy staff. Attributes ======= CASE_REF_NO: Management Plan reference number CONSERVANCY: Conservancy RPAC: Regional Proposal Assessment Committee GRID_REF: National Grid Reference AGREED_AREA: Area agreed for the Management Plan DATE_AGREED: Plan start date DATE_EXPIRES: Plan end date

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    Scotland’s woodlands and forests are a vital national resource and play an important role in rural development and sustainable land use. As well as helping to reduce the impacts of climate change and providing timber for industry, our forests enhance and protect the environment and provide opportunities for public enjoyment. The Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS) will support: - the creation of new woodlands, contributing towards the Scottish Government target of over 10,000 hectares of new woodlands per year - the sustainable management of existing woodlands AGRO-FORESTRY =============== The two options in this category support creation of small scale woodlands on agricultural pasture or forage land. This will allow for an integrated approach to land management where there is a mix of trees and sheep grazing. Each option relates to how many trees you want to plant: - 400 trees per hectare - 200 trees per hectare

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    Description: ======================================= This dataset applies to Felling Licence Applications recieved by Scottish Forestry (formerly Forestry Commission Scotland) after 1st January 2012 and administered using Scottish Forestry's Case Management System. ======================================= Anyone wishing to fell trees must ensure that a licence or permission under a grant scheme has been issued by Scottish Forestry before any felling is carried out or that one of the exceptions apply. You normally need to get permission from Scottish Forestry to fell growing trees. This is usually given in a Felling Licence or an approval under a grant scheme. In certain circumstances you may also need special permission from another organisation for any proposed felling. This sometimes applies even if you do not need a Felling Licence. Everyone involved in the felling of trees, whether doing the work or by engaging others, eg. the owner, agent, timber merchant or contractor, must ensure that a licence or approval under a grant scheme has been issued before any felling is carried out or that one of the exceptions apply. They must also ensure that the work is carried out in accordance with the terms of a Scottish Forestry permission. If there is no licence or other valid permission, or if the wrong trees are felled, anyone involved can be prosecuted. Do not begin felling until Scottish Forestry have issued a licence or other permission. Any felling carried out without either a licence or other permission is an offence, unless it is covered by an exception. Attributes: CASE_REF : Case reference number PROPERTY NAME : Property name PROPERTY NAME : Woodland name AREA_BL : Broadleaf area to be felled (for whole licenced area) AREA_CON : Conifer area to be felled (for whole licenced area) NEAREST_TOWN : Nearest town LOCAL_AUTH : Local Authority CONS : Conservancy GRID_REF : National Grid Reference STATUS : The current status of the application DATE REG : Date Registered PUBLIC CONS START : Public consultation start date PUBLIC CONS END : Public consultation end date DECISION : The felling licence decision DATE VALID : The date of the licence decision DATE CLOSED : The date the licence closed RESTCK_DUE : The date of any restocking requirements FELL_OPERATION : The type of felling operation FELL_VOLUME : The estimated volume from felling in cubic meters. Applies to the specific operation FELL_AREA : The applicants estimated area of felling. Applies to the specific operation

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    Woodlands In and Around Towns (WIAT) The Woods In and Around Towns (WIAT) Programme provides the focus for Scottish Forestry’s work on improving quality of life in towns and cities. The purpose of WIAT is to: - Bring neglected woodland into active management. - Work with people to help them use their local woodland. There are four key characteristics of woodland that determine whether it improves quality of life: 1. Where it is The woodland must be close to where people live and/or work. We will undertake WIAT related activities within 1km of settlements of over 2000 people (Fig 1). Within the WIAT area, deprived areas are a priority. 2. How it is managed Management for people will be the top priority in most WIAT woodlands. Woods should be safe and welcoming to all. WIAT woodland is also important for other aspects of forestry such as biodiversity. Woodland involved in WIAT should be managed in accordance with the UK Forestry Standard. 3. How it is connected to other woodland and greenspace WIAT will promote the creation and management of woodland that is close to other woodland and greenspace so that it contributes to green networks. Paths should link the networks. 4. How it is connected to people Most of the activity in this programme is directed at the physical elements of WIAT: where it is, how it is managed, and how it is connected into green networks. However, reaching out to people should be part of every WIAT project to help people use woodland.

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    The Woodland Grant Scheme (WGS) provided incentives for people to create and manage woodlands on sites all over Great Britain. The Forestry Commission (now Scottish Forestry) paid grants for establishing and looking after woodlands and forests. To qualify for grant the applicant had to meet the standards of environmental protection and practice set out in the Forestry Commission’s guidelines at that time. WGS2 operated between June 1991 and September 1994. It was replaced by WGS3 Updates to scheme boundaries and grant aided areas were incorporated into the dataset on a regular basis until the end of 2012. No further changes will be made after this time.

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    Scotland’s woodlands and forests are a vital national resource and play an important role in rural development and sustainable land use. As well as helping to reduce the impacts of climate change and providing timber for industry, our forests enhance and protect the environment and provide opportunities for public enjoyment. The Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS) will support: - the creation of new woodlands, contributing towards the Scottish Government target of over 10,000 hectares of new woodlands per year - the sustainable management of existing woodlands NATIVE WOODLAND ================== The aims of this option are to: - maintain native woodland - bring native woodlands and designated woodland features into good ecological condition - restore Plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites to native woodland through deer control and the natural regeneration Native woodlands include a range of habitat types that are all UK priority habitats, while some are also European priority types. Good ecological condition of woodland depends partly on its character, age and management history. In general, woodland in good ecological condition contains a variety of open ground, native trees and shrubs and wildlife species expected for the type of woodland. The proposed management must be suitable for the ecosystem to be sustained, adapted or expanded. You must control any threats from non-native species or inappropriate levels of grazing and browsing so that natural regeneration is encouraged.

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    Scotland’s woodlands and forests are a vital national resource and play an important role in rural development and sustainable land use. As well as helping to reduce the impacts of climate change and providing timber for industry, our forests enhance and protect the environment and provide opportunities for public enjoyment. The Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS) will support: - the creation of new woodlands, contributing towards the Scottish Government target of over 10,000 hectares of new woodlands per year - the sustainable management of existing woodlands TREE HEALTH - OPTION ==================== This option provides support to prevent the spread of Phytophthora ramorum (P. ramorum). This option helps with the restoration of forests affected by P. ramorum by supporting the work to remove affected trees and carry out subsequent replanting.