From 1 - 10 / 78
  • Categories  

    Forest Enterprise Scotland comprises 10 Forest District boundary areas. Forest Enterprise England comprises 6 Forest District boundary areas. Attributes: DISTRICT Forest District Name ADDRESS_1 Address ADDRESS_2 Address ADDRESS_3 Address ADDRESS_4 Address POSTCODE Postcode PHONE_NO Telephone Number EMAIL Email Address © Crown copyright and database right 'year'.\\nOrdnance Survey Licence number 100021242

  • Categories  

    National Forest Estate Bridges are managed by Forestry Civil Engineering in one of the Forestry Commission's Forester GIS modules. This data set comprises location and category of construction. Attributes; FCE_REF - Unique ID ref LOCATION - Geographical descriptor GRID_REF - Ordnance Survey National Grid Reference BRIDGE_TYPE - Bridge construction type

  • Categories  

    Scottish Forestry Grant Scheme - SFGS Following publication of the Scottish Executive’s Scottish Forestry Strategy 'Forests for Scotland' the opportunity was taken to review the Woodland Grant Scheme and the Farm Woodland Premium Scheme and give them a greater Scottish focus. The Scottish Forestry Grant Scheme (SFGS) - encouraged the creation and management of woods and forests to provide economic, environmental and social benefits. Grants were available under three main areas: - Grants for woodland expansion - creating new woodlands. - Restocking grants, for replanting following felling. - Stewardship grants, for a range of activities in existing woodlands. Applications for SFGS grants started in June 2003 and closed in August 2006. Most grants for SFGS were based on a percentage of Standard Costs of agreed operations. The Standard Cost took account of the costs of labour, plants, machinery, materials and supervision to do work to the specification as set out in the SFGS Standard Costs and Specifications Booklet. Depending upon the level of public benefit, grant payments were either at 60% or 90% of the Standard Cost. In the case of restocking, Standard Costs were mostly pitched at 75% of the new planting Standard Costs. Grants were available for planting proposals that met one or more of the following objectives: - Establishing well-designed productive woodland. - Expanding areas of native woodland, preferably through natural regeneration and the development of Forest Habitat Networks. - Improving riparian habitat. - Improving the quality and setting of urban or post-industrial areas. - Improving the diversity of the farmed and crofting landscape. Details of all eligible operations are set out within the 'Applicants Booklet' available from Conservancy Offices. ************************SFGS OBJECTIVES**************************** The abbreviations below list the SFGS objectives proposals are designed to meet: Establishment grants P1 to establish well-designed productive forest P2 to expand the area of native woodland P3 to improve a riparian habitat P4 to improve the quality and setting of urban or post-industrial areas P5 to improve the diversity of the farmed/crofting landscape Stewardship Grants S1 to improve timber quality S2 to reduce deer numbers S3 to improve the ecological value of native woodlands S4 to improve woodland biodiversity S5 to enhance landscape value S6 to develop alternative systems to clear-felling S7 to develop woodland recreation S8 to develop community involvement Restocking grants R1 to produce well designed productive forest R2 to restore areas of native woodland R3 to improve riparian habitat R4 to improve the quality and setting of urban or post-industrial areas R5 to improve the diversity of the farmed/crofting landscape Felling F1 Clear felling F2 Selective felling F3 Continuous Cover F4 Thinning Other land OL is not grant aided ************************** SPATIAL DATA ********************************** There are four spatial datasets associated with SFGS. These represent the scheme boundary, management plan boundaries, sub-compartment boundaries and deer fence lines within each approved SFGS scheme. The spatial datasets are related to the GLS database on a 'many to one' basis. This reflects the fact that many operations may occur within one sub-compartment. Data is captured against OS Mastermap. ********************************************************************************** Management Plan Operation References 200 - Reducing deer numbers 300 - Management plan for semi natural woodland 301 - Survey for woodland condition 302 - Biodiversity monitoring 400 - Management plan for semi natural woodland 401 - Survey for woodland condition 402 - Biodiversity monitoring 500 - Landscape design plan 501 - Landscape baseline survey 502 - Landscape monitoring 600 - Alternative system to clearfell. Site survey and stand appraisal. 601 - Management plan to develop alternative system to clearfell 602 - Alternative system to clearfell. Site monitoring. 603 - Alternative system to clearfell. Stand appraisal. 700 - Recreation area management plan 800 - Feasibility assessment 801 - Training/on-going community involvement (CGIS do not capture) 900 - Management Plan 901 - Woodland Survey 902 - Monitoring ************************** SPATIAL DATA ********************************** There are four spatial datasets associated with SFGS. These represent the scheme boundaries, management plan boundaries, sub-compartment boundaries and deer fence lines within each approved SFGS scheme. Each SFGS spatial dataset is accompanied by a specific non-spatial database table. The datasets can be related to each other on a 'many to one' basis. This reflects the fact that many SFGS operations may occur within one spatial geography (eg.a sub-compartment). The S_SFGS_MAN_PLAN spatial dataset can be 'related' to the S_LINK_SFGS_OPSMANPLAN table using the 'SC_Link' attribute field. ********************************************************************************** S_SFGS_MAN_PLAN Spatial Attributes:- Attributes: SchemeNo SFGS Scheme number SC_Link Concatenated field used to relate spatial data to table Grant_Type Grant type code SchemeName Name of SFGS Scheme Cons_Name Conservancy Agent_Name Forestry Agent Cont_Start Date contract started Local_Auth Local Authority Status Scheme status Obj_Code SFGS Objective code Descriptor Description of spatial feature ***************************************************************************** S_LINK_SFGS_OPSMANPLAN Database Table Attributes:- Atributes: SchemeNo SFGS Scheme number SC_Link Concatenated field used to relate table to spatial data Scheme_Type Type of scheme (SFGS, Forest Plan, etc) Grant_Type Grant type code Descriptor Description of grant type Claim_No Claim number Quantity Length, number or area of operation Unit Unit of operation (eg. metres, visits, hectares) Pct_Cost Percentage of total cost paid under SFGS Pay_Rate Payment rate per unit (£) Grant _Paid Amount of grant paid (£) Pay_In_FY Financial year in which payment should be made Obj_Code SFGS Objective code (see above for full descriptions) *****************************************************************************

  • Categories  

    Description: Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) has the largest natural distribution of any conifer in the world, ranging from northern Norway to Spain, and from Scotland across Europe and Asia to Siberia and north-east China. It can grow on a range of soil types, surviving where the rainfall is as low as 200mm, and/or where the temperature drops to -64 degrees C. In Scotland, pines were an important component of post-glacial natural forests (the so-called Wood of Caledon) which covered an estimated 70% of the country. They were largely confined to the poorest soils, often occurring in association with birch, but they also grew in mixture with other species in natural transitions to oak, ash and elm dominated woodland on the better soils, and to willows and alder on wet areas. Over many centuries vast areas of these ancient forests were cleared, and pinewood regeneration was prevented, either by allowing the land to be grazed or by replanting it with other tree species, usually of non-native origin. Other adverse effects were the browsing of deer and 'muirburning' to improve the grazing or the age structure of heather on adjacent grouse moors. Pinewoods vary enormously in size, structure and natural species diversity. In Deeside, Strathspey and the Beauly catchment the pine-dominated woodlands are relatively extensive, but in Glen Falloch and Glen Loyne there are only a few old trees scattered over a large area. Other pinewoods occur on steep cliff faces, or in gorge woodlands, such as at Glen Avon, Allt Chaorunn and Attadale, where there may be several age classes present. The wet western pinewoods are more fragmented and isolated than most, and are generally regarded as being in the poorest condition, occasionally merging with oak, alder and other woodland types, indicating that there is scope for re-creating large new mixed native forests in those areas. There are also biochemical differences between pinewoods; these are indicative of genetic variation. Of the seven Regions of biochemical similarity identified, the North West Biochemical Region, near Kinlochewe, is the most distinct, exhibiting considerable differences between individual pinewoods. It is known from the analysis of pollen records taken from peat bogs that pine has been present in North West Scotland for at least 8500 years, but when combined with the genetic information one may begin to speculate that the pines we see now are the direct descendants of trees which survived the last ice age either in Ireland, or possibly on areas of the continental shelf exposed by the lowered sea levels at that time. The pinewoods of the South West Biochemical Region, around Fort William, are another distinct group. They show less variation between the fragments, although it is believed that they had a similar history to those in the North West Biochemical Region. The biochemical characteristics of the other pinewoods in Scotland are not so dissimilar, and these pinewoods seem to have more in common with Central Europe pinewoods. In 1959 Steven and Carlisle published their book 'The Native Pinewoods of Scotland', in which they listed and described most of what they regarded as surviving (ex-Caledonian Forest ) pinewoods. This stimulated an interest in pinewood conservation, and in due course the introduction of a number of incentives to support pinewood management and expansion. More recently the native pinewoods of Scotland have been listed as an endangered habitat in the EC Habitats Directive. They are also the subject of a costed Habitat Action Plan (prepared under the UK Biodiversity Plan) which gives quantitative targets for the protection, restoration and expansion of the pinewoods by both natural regeneration and replanting. These targets are based on an earlier version of this Inventory. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To prepare the Caledonian Pinewood Inventory, the current extent of the native pinewoods named by Steven and Carlisle, have been investigated. Some of the pinewood fragments which they thought were too small to form discreet pinewood habitats, have also been considered. The total pinewood area now included in the Inventory is nearly 18000 hectares, and comprises 84 separate pinewoods of various sizes. In all cases the balance of probability suggests that they are genuinely native, that is, descended from one generation to another by natural seeding. In addition, each pinewood has: • a minimum density of 4 pine trees per hectare, excluding trees less than 2 metres in height, or at least 50 pine trees per hectare where sites have been extensively underplanted but are deemed capable of restoration to a more natural state; • a minimum of 30 individual trees, unless the wood has historical, aethetic or biological significance; • vegetation which is characteristic of native pinewood, although possibly of a depleted diversity; • a semi-natural soil profile, but accepting also sites with superficial cultivation such as shallow ploughing or scarification with some widely spaced drains. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Inventory Rules: PINEWOOD FRAGMENT Recorded separately if more than 1.5km from another fragment. REGENERATION ZONE Standard 100m but more if conditions indicate spread is likely to be greater (e.g. Glen Tanar). Where regeneration is likely to be less, such as a fragment of pine in an oakwood, then a smaller regeneration zone may be indicated (e.g. Loch Maree Islands). Area does not normally include open water unless the whole of the open water is within the pinewood and regeneration zone. BUFFER ZONE Standard 500m beyond regeneration zone but can be extended further:- 500m beyond watershed or 700m above sea level (e.g. Gleann Fuar) link fragments together (e.g. Barisdale) Buffer zones will not include extensive areas of open water (e.g. South Loch Arkaig) unless the whole of the open water is within the buffer zone. Where the buffer zone includes some ground on the other shore of a loch then the water will be part of the buffer zone (e.g. Loch Hourn). PLANTED AREAS If of correct local origin then accept as pinewood if less than a third of total area of pinewood. The planted areas would be hatched on the maps and recorded as part of the regeneration zone not as part of the pinewood. Planted areas of correct origin, which are alongside pinewood, can have the regeneration zone round them (e.g. Doire Darach). Where a planted area has just been planted or is to be planted and is more than a third of the area of the pinewood, then it may be considered as part of the buffer zone and the buffer zone may be extended to 500m beyond the planted area (e.g. Breda). Planted areas of local origin which are more than 500m from the pinewood will be ignored. ATTRIBUTES =========== FEATCODE: Feature Code FEATDESC: Feature Description PINEID: Pinewood ID PINENAME: Pinewood Name NGR: National Grid Reference COREAREA: Area of the core woodland (Ha) REGENAREA: Area of the regneration zone (Ha) BUFFERAREA: Area of the buffer zone (Ha) TOTALAREA: Total area (Ha) BIOCHEM: Biochemical region

  • Categories  

    The Woodlands In and Around Towns (WIAT) programme provides the focus for Forestry Commission Scotland's work on improving quality of life in towns and cities. This dataset relates to the second phase of the WIAT programme which started in April 2008. This dataset contains the Car Parks of approved WIAT applications. Additionally there are datasets which show the location of the boundary and footpaths of WIAT applications.

  • Categories  

    The Woodlands In and Around Towns (WIAT) programme provides the focus for Forestry Commission Scotland's work on improving quality of life in towns and cities. This dataset relates to the second phase of the WIAT programme which started in April 2008. This dataset contains the boundary of approved WIAT applications. Additionally there are datasets which show the location of car parks and footpaths of WIAT applications.

  • Categories  

    The Woodland Grant Scheme (WGS) provides incentives for people to create and manage woodlands on sites all over Great Britain. The Forestry Commission pays grants for establishing and looking after woodlands and forests. To qualify for grant the applicant must meet the standards of environmental protection and practice set out in the Forestry Commission’s guidelines. WGS1 operated between June 1988 and June 1991. Updates to scheme boundaries and grant aided areas were incorporated into the dataset on a regular basis until the end of 2004. No further changes will be made after this time.

  • Categories  

    Forest Reproductive Material (FRM) is the generic name for the seeds, cones, cuttings and planting stock used in forest establishment. The 46 tree species and the genus Populus (including aspen, black poplar and grey poplar) covered by the Regulations are known as the “controlled species”. The Forest Reproductive Material (Great Britain) Regulations 2002 regulate the marketing of FRM. These Regulations came into force on 1st January 2003 and implement EC Directive 1999/105. The Forestry Commission is the Official Body that is responsible for the FRM Regulations in England, Scotland and Wales. The Forestry Commission maintains the National Register of Approved Basic Material for Great Britain (The National Register). Each entry of basic material (or unit of approval) in the National Register is given a unique register reference that encodes: Species name Type of basic material Category of reproductive material to be produced Region of provenance Native seed zone (where appropriate) Altitude zone (if the species is native to GB) Origin (that part of the species’ natural range from which the material derives). The attributes of each polygon in this dataset are restricted to the National Register Identification Number (NRID), a national grid reference (NGR), a Basic Material 'category' symbol and the land area, in hectares. All other details mentioned above are available in the National Register. Basic Material is the plant material from which the Forest Reproductive Material (FRM) is derived and includes seed stands, seed orchards, parent material held by tree breeders in archives, individual clones and mixtures of clones. There are six types of basic material: Seed sources: This covers all material from a single tree to any collection of trees within a region of provenance or seed zone. Stands: Specifically identified areas or groups of trees with identified boundaries . Seed orchards: Sources based upon known individuals derived from tree breeding. Parents of families: Sources based upon known individuals derived from tree breeding. Clones: Individually identified trees from which the FRM will be produced through vegetative propagation . Clonal mixtures: Individually identified trees from which the FRM will be produced through vegetative propagation. Forest Reproductive Material (FRM) is cones, fruits and seeds, all parts of plants obtained by vegetative propagation, including embryos and plants produced from any of these. Normally, only FRM that comes from registered basic material can be marketed. There are four categories of reproductive material according to the basic material from which it is collected and these are recorded in this dataset: Source identified FRM (symbol SI): Comes from general or specific locations within a single region of provenance or seed zone altitude band in which no specific superior qualities are recognised. Selected FRM (symbol SE): Collected from stands showing superior characteristics, e.g. better form, growth rate and health. Qualified FRM (symbol QU): Derived from the selection of superior individual trees which have not undergone any form of testing. Tested FRM (symbol TE): Derived from the selection of individual trees or stands that have undergone evaluation for genetic quality or have been shown to be superior, in comparison to accepted standards.

  • Categories  

    The aim of the Native Woodland Survey of Scotland (NWSS) was to undertake a baseline survey of all native woodlands, nearly native woodlands and PAWS sites in Scotland in order to create a woodland map linked to a dataset showing type, extent and condition of those woods. The objectives were to: 1. Identify the location, type, extent and condition of all native and nearly native woodlands and Plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites (PAWS - as identified from the Ancient Woodland Inventory) in Scotland. 2. Produce a baseline survey map of all native woodland, nearly native woodland and PAWS in Scotland. 3. Collect baseline information to enable future monitoring of the extent and condition of the total Scottish native woodland resource. 4. Provide information to support policy development and the delivery of social, environmental and development forestry. The following datasets are available on the Forestry Commission's Spatial Data Repository (SDR). FC.S_NWSS (base map and polygon level attributes) FC.S_NWSS_INVASIVES_POLYGONS (spatial data for polygons where there is presence of invasive species) FC.S_NWSS_CANOPY_STRUCTURES FC.S_NWSS_HABITAT_COMPONENTS FC.S_NWSS_HERBIVORE_IMPACT FC.S_NWSS_INVASIVES FC.S_NWSS_OTHER_TRAITS FC.S_NWSS_SPECIES_STRUCTURES The following describes the layers available in the FC Scotland Map Browser and also gives an indication of the nature of the spatial data and the related component non-spatial data. (N.B. Every table contains a SCPTDATA_I field. This is a unique field which is used to link all other component tables). If you wish to carry out complex analysis, particularly involving elements of the components tables, e.g. species selection, you should do so using GIS software rather than the FC Scotland Map Browser. NWSS Map: This is a straightforward view of the data which describes the type of NWSS polygon based on the following categories: Native woodland: >50% native species in the canopy Nearly-native woodland: >=40% and <=50% native species in the canopy Open land habitat: <20% canopy cover, usually 100% surrounded by woodland and adjoining a native woodland PAWS: A woodland area wholly or partially identified in the Ancient Semi-natural Woodland Inventory as ancient semi-natural but currently not semi-natural. NWSS Nativeness: Displays the percentage share of native species in the total canopy. This ranges from 0% to 100% in 5% classes. NWSS Habitat: This view of the data shows the priority woodland type and National Vegetation Classification (NVC) woodland community. Open land habitat is defined by UK Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) type. A dominant habitat is recorded for each polygon, however some polygons have habitats of equal dominance. In this case only one of the habitats is recorded in the top level spatial data. To identify all of the habitats in a particular polygon please refer to the FC_S_NWSS_HABITAT_COMPONENTS table or use the map browser identify tool on the NWSS Habitats layer. Plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites (PAWS) may not display in the Habitat layer if a surveyor has not recorded a native priority habitat type for the site. This will happen when a site is non-native. NWSS Canopy Cover: Displays as a percentage, an assessment of the area covered by trees/shrubs. Values range from 0% to 100% in 10% classes. A minimum of 20% canopy cover is required to define woodland, so the 10% and 20% bands are skewed to allow for this. NWSS Canopy Structures: This displays the number of different structures recorded in a polygon (ranging from 0 to 6). The types of recorded structures are veteran, mature, pole immature, shrub, established regeneration or visible regeneration. A dominant structure is recorded for each polygon, however some polygons have structures of equal dominance. In this case only one of the structures is recorded in the top level spatial data. To identify all of the structures in a particular polygon please refer to the FC_S_NWSS_CANOPY_STRUCTURES table or use the map browser identify tool on the NWSS Canopy Structures layer. Information on the species identified in each polygon is also in the NWSS Canopy Structures layer and table. * indicates a species which is classed as native for the purpose of the survey. + indicates a species is a shrub not a tree. NWSS Semi-naturalness: This view of the data shows the percentage of the polygon that is semi-natural. Values range from 0% to 100% in 10% bands. NWSS Maturity: This indicates the approximate stage of woodland development as either: mature, young, regenerating, mixed or shrub. The value is based on the dominance of the structures recorded; a mixed maturity means that none of the others values are dominant. NWSS Other Traits: This layer records whether or not there are any other attributes which have been recorded in the polygon. The details of any other traits that have been found can be accessed by viewing the related information attached to a polygon. NWSS Herbivore Impact: This view of the data shows the overall impact that herbivores have had on a polygon. NWSS Invasives: This is a separate spatial dataset on the Forestry Commission Spatial Data Repository. It contains a subset of the overall NWSS Map dataset which includes only those polygons were there is some presence of an invasive species. The layer is symbolised on the percentage of invasive species with the polygons, show in 25% bands. The data itself contains more detailed information which is broken down into 5% bands. Summary of Attributes SCPTDATA_I Polygon ID (Unique identifier) PAWS_SURVY Surveyed as PAWS TYPE Type CANOPY_PCT Canopy cover percentage NATIVE_PCT Native species percentage DOM_HABITA Dominant habitat type DOM_HB_PCT Dominant habitat type percentage SEMINT_PCT Semi-natural percentage STRUCT_NUM Number of structures MATURITY Maturity DOM_STRUCT Dominant structure HERBIVORE Herbivore impact ER_NAT_PCT Percentage of establish regeneration of native species INVASV_PCT Invasive species percentage INVASV_NUM Number of invasive species OTHR_TRAIT Other traits recorded HECTARES Area in hectares

  • Categories  

    Woodland Creation forms part of the Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) 2007 - 2013. The SRDP is a programme of economic, environmental and social measures, utilising some €680m of European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development funding plus Scottish Government match funding. The current programme is designed to support rural Scotland from 2007 to 2013. Individuals and groups may seek funding to help deliver the Government's strategic objectives in rural Scotland. Woodlands are a vital sustainable natural resource and funding aims to encourage the creation of new woodlands with grants that will contribute to the cost of their establishment. Within Rural Priorities there are eight woodland creation options. Productive conifer woodland (low cost) Productive conifer woodland (high cost) Productive broadleaved woodland Native Woodlands Naturally regenerated native woodland Mixed conifer/broadleaf woodland Northern & Western Isles Native Woodland Central Scotland Mixed Woodland The woodland creation polygons in this dataset represent the areas which have been approved for new planting. Data is captured by the woodland creation option type and by the year the planting is intended to take place (claim year). A boundary which encompasses all the new planting options and claim years within a specific case is available in the Woodland Creation Boundary RDC dataset. Dataset Attributes: CASE_NO : SRDP RDC-RP Case Reference Number CLAIM_YEAR : Year planting is due to take place and grant claimed RPAC : Name of RPAC Region (Regional Proposal Assessment Committee) ORGANISTN : Name of organisation responsible for administering the case CASE_OFFCR : Name of Case Officer responsible for the case RDC_OPTION : RDC-RP Option Code and Description TOTAL_AREA : Total area of the option approved within the case