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    National Forest Estate Bridges are managed by Forestry Civil Engineering in one of the Forestry Commission's Forester GIS modules. This data set comprises location and category of construction. Attributes; FCE_REF - Unique ID ref LOCATION - Geographical descriptor GRID_REF - Ordnance Survey National Grid Reference BRIDGE_TYPE - Bridge construction type

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    The Woodland Carbon Code (www.forestry.gov.uk/carboncode) is the standard for UK woodland creation projects where carbon is accounted for. It is managed by the Forestry Commission. All projects have to register, and are publicly available on the UK Woodland Carbon Registry, managed by Markit (www.markit.com/product/registry). Once registered, they are validated at the outset and then verified at regular intervals throughout the project to check the amount of carbon sequestered, and that the project is sustainably managed. Woodland Carbon Code projects are expected to be managed in line with their agreed management plan (to ensure the predicted amount of carbon sequestration is realised), and a landowner has the responsibility to ensure future landowners are aware of the commitment of a particular land area to the Woodland Carbon Code, should an area of woodland be sold. This dataset gives the spatial extent of the Woodland Carbon Code projects, along with their current status, species type, and country. The majority of projects also receive a woodland creation grant, but some Woodland Carbon Code projects also include non-grant aided areas, or are not grant aided at all. Woodland Carbon Code statistics are produced quarterly on the last day of March, June, September and December and available from http://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/infd-93yjte. This layer will be updated each quarter alongside the statistics update.

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    Physical recreation feature on the ground best depicted as point. These features a divided into eight Categories... Signage - FC branded signs, information and navigational aids, which have management activity and investment (e.g. trailhead, waymarker, information board, access point, finger post). Built feature - Purpose built and installed FC asset, which has management activity and investment (e.g. Gate, stile, bin, barrier, ticket machine, counter, steps, footbridge, BBQ, bollard, service point (e.g. bike wash, tap)). Forest furniture - Purpose built and installed FC asset, which has management activity and investment (e.g. Bench, seat, picnic table). Exercise - Purpose built and installed FC asset, which has management activity and investment (e.g. Activity point). Play equipment - Purpose built and installed FC asset, which has management activity and investment (e.g. Play component, structure). Viewpoint - A feature which has management activity and investment. Art feature - Purpose built and installed FC asset or agreed feature, which has management activity and investment (e.g. Art work, sculpture). Forest entrance - Regularly used feature to gain access to the forest/FE estate (e.g. Car park or layby access point). Miscellaneous - Features which do not fall into one of the existing feature types, but required to be captured for management purposes. Within each Category there are a number of Asset types.... Trailhead Way marker Interpretation Information Board Location Ladderboard Gate Stile Bin Barrier Ticket Machine Car Counter Steps Footbridge BBQ Fishing Pag Stepping Stones Bollard Sculpture Bench Seat Activity Point Structure Access point Rendezvous Point Play Component Art Work Finger Post Flag Pole Primary Secondary Culvert Services Point Picnic tables ...and Asset Subtypes... Orienteering marker Vehicle Pedestrian Only A Dog Bin Litter Bin Donation Charge Heavy Vehicle Light Vehicle Pedestrian/horse Pedestrian only Permanent Removable Dragons Teeth Toddler Children Recycling Bin Pay on Foot Barrier Stone Built BBQ Picnic Table BBQ Metal Wood Bridle Gate Restricted Step Stile Ladder Stile Bike Wash Tap Sanitation Point Standard Access to all

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    Description: ======================================= This dataset applies to Felling Licence Application recieved by the Forestry Commission after 1st January 2012 and administered using Forestry Commission Scotland's Case Management System. ======================================= Anyone wishing to fell trees must ensure that a licence or permission under a grant scheme has been issued by the Forestry Commission before any felling is carried out or that one of the exceptions apply. You normally need to get permission from the Forestry Commission to fell growing trees. This is usually given in a Felling Licence or an approval under a grant scheme. In certain circumstances you may also need special permission from another organisation for any proposed felling. This sometimes applies even if you do not need a Felling Licence. Everyone involved in the felling of trees, whether doing the work or by engaging others, eg. the owner, agent, timber merchant or contractor, must ensure that a licence or approval under a grant scheme has been issued before any felling is carried out or that one of the exceptions apply. They must also ensure that the work is carried out in accordance with the terms of a Forestry Commission permission. If there is no licence or other valid permission, or if the wrong trees are felled, anyone involved can be prosecuted. Do not begin felling until the Forestry Commission have issued a licence or other permission. Any felling carried out without either a licence or other permission is an offence, unless it is covered by an exception. Full details are available in the Forestry Commission's booklet 'Tree Felling - Getting Permission'. Attributes: CASE_REF : Case reference number PROPERTY : Property name WOODLAND : Woodland name AREA_BL : Broadleaf area to be felled (for whole licenced area) AREA_CON : Conifer area to be felled (for whole licenced area) WOOD_OFFCR : Woodland Officer assigned to the case NRST_TOWN : Nearest town LOCAL_AUTH : Local Authority CONS : Conservancy GRID_REF : National Grid Reference STATUS : The current status of the application DECISION : The felling licence decision DECISN_DAT : The date of the licence decision EXPIRY_DAT : The date the licence expires RESTCK_DAT : The date of any restocking requirements FELL_TYPE : The type of felling operation EST_VOLUME : The estimated volume from felling in cubic meters. Applies to the specific operation EST_AREA : The applicants estimated area of felling. Applies to the specific operation CALC_AREA : The digitised (GIS) area of felling.

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    Woodlands In and Around Towns (WIAT) The Woods In and Around Towns (WIAT) Programme provides the focus for Forestry Commission Scotland’s work on improving quality of life in towns and cities. The purpose of WIAT is to: - Bring neglected woodland into active management. - Work with people to help them use their local woodland. There are four key characteristics of woodland that determine whether it improves quality of life: 1. Where it is The woodland must be close to where people live and/or work. We will undertake WIAT related activities within 1km of settlements of over 2000 people (Fig 1). Within the WIAT area, deprived areas are a priority. 2. How it is managed Management for people will be the top priority in most WIAT woodlands. Woods should be safe and welcoming to all. WIAT woodland is also important for other aspects of forestry such as biodiversity. Woodland involved in WIAT should be managed in accordance with the UK Forestry Standard. 3. How it is connected to other woodland and greenspace WIAT will promote the creation and management of woodland that is close to other woodland and greenspace so that it contributes to green networks. Paths should link the networks. 4. How it is connected to people Most of the activity in this programme is directed at the physical elements of WIAT: where it is, how it is managed, and how it is connected into green networks. However, reaching out to people should be part of every WIAT project to help people use woodland.

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    The Woodland Grant Scheme (WGS) provides incentives for people to create and manage woodlands on sites all over Great Britain. The Forestry Commission pays grants for establishing and looking after woodlands and forests. To qualify for grant the applicant must meet the standards of environmental protection and practice set out in the Forestry Commission’s guidelines. WGS2 operated between June 1991 and September 1994. It was replaced by WGS3 Updates to scheme boundaries and grant aided areas were incorporated into the dataset on a regular basis until the end of 2012. No further changes will be made after this time.

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    Anyone wishing to fell trees must ensure that a licence or permission under a grant scheme has been issued by the Forestry Commission before any felling is carried out or that one of the exceptions apply. You normally need to get permission from the Forestry Commission to fell growing trees. This is usually given in a Felling Licence or an approval under a grant scheme. In certain circumstances you may also need special permission from another organisation for any proposed felling. This sometimes applies even if you do not need a Felling Licence. Everyone involved in the felling of trees, whether doing the work or by engaging others, eg. the owner, agent, timber merchant or contractor, must ensure that a licence or approval under a grant scheme has been issued before any felling is carried out or that one of the exceptions apply. They must also ensure that the work is carried out in accordance with the terms of a Forestry Commission permission. If there is no licence or other valid permission, or if the wrong trees are felled, anyone involved can be prosecuted. Do not begin felling until the Forestry Commission have issued a licence or other permission. Any felling carried out without either a licence or other permission is an offence, unless it is covered by an exception. Full details are available in the Forestry Commission's booklet 'Tree Felling - Getting Permission'.

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    The pinewood zone is the area within Scotland where Scots pine - pinus sylvestris is deemed a native species; outside of this zone it is believed that pine is not native.

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    Scotland’s woodlands and forests are a vital national resource and play an important role in rural development and sustainable land use. As well as helping to reduce the impacts of climate change and providing timber for industry, our forests enhance and protect the environment and provide opportunities for public enjoyment. The Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS) will support: - the creation of new woodlands, contributing towards the Scottish Government target of 10,000 hectares of new woodlands per year - the sustainable management of existing woodlands NATIVE WOODLAND ================== The aims of this option are to: - maintain native woodland - bring native woodlands and designated woodland features into good ecological condition - restore Plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites to native woodland through deer control and the natural regeneration Native woodlands include a range of habitat types that are all UK priority habitats, while some are also European priority types. Good ecological condition of woodland depends partly on its character, age and management history. In general, woodland in good ecological condition contains a variety of open ground, native trees and shrubs and wildlife species expected for the type of woodland. The proposed management must be suitable for the ecosystem to be sustained, adapted or expanded. You must control any threats from non-native species or inappropriate levels of grazing and browsing so that natural regeneration is encouraged.

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    Scotland’s woodlands and forests are a vital national resource and play an important role in rural development and sustainable land use. As well as helping to reduce the impacts of climate change and providing timber for industry, our forests enhance and protect the environment and provide opportunities for public enjoyment. The Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS) will support: - the creation of new woodlands, contributing towards the Scottish Government target of 10,000 hectares of new woodlands per year - the sustainable management of existing woodlands TREE HEALTH - OPTION ==================== This option provides support to prevent the spread of Phytophthora ramorum (P. ramorum). This option helps with the restoration of forests affected by P. ramorum by supporting the work to remove affected trees and carry out subsequent replanting.