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Boundaries

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    Community Council boundaries adopted in November 2011.

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    Perth Green Belt from the 2014 Perth & Kinross Council Adopted Local Development Plan

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    This GIS Layer details the Flare Zones within the Highland Council Area. A Flare Zone is an administrative area referred to within the operations for Environmental Health. Flare is the Information Management System used within the Environmental Health Function of The Highland Council - this database is also known as CIVICA APP.

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    A 2001 Census Area Statistic (CAS) sector was one of 2 special postcode sectors created for 2001 Census Output. A postcode sector comprises all the unit postcodes that have the same identifier except for the last two characters. Special postcode sectors are created for census output to ensure sectors conform to a minimum threshold and do not cross Council Area boundaries. CAS sectors have a minimum threshold of 20 households and 50 persons, the same minimum threshold as Census Output Areas. There are 1,010 CAS sectors.

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    This dataset portrays the boundaries of ‘Localities’ in Scotland as at the 1991 Census.. There is widespread interest in statistics for the built-up areas in Scotland as most of the population lives in a built-up environment. When the former two-tier local government structure of regions and districts came into being in May 1975, the small local authorities known as large and small burghs were lost. However, Census users stated that there was a need to know the population (and characteristics) of built-up areas. For 1991 Localities, information on the area of a postcode was available from the digitised postcode boundaries and also on the postcode’s population from the 1991 Census. The method used to identify localities in 1991 was basically to classify a postcode as either urban or rural based on population density. Groups of urban (high population density) postcodes were identified where the number of residents in all the postcodes in the group was 500 or more. The final stage was to ask the local authorities to suggest any changes which might refine the boundaries of the identified settlements. This method identified 603 localities, 448 of which contained 1,000 residents or more, with the remainder containing a population of 500 or more but less that 1000.

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    This dataset shows the 2011 Census Output Areas (OAs). OAs are the smallest geographical unit for which Census data is released, and as a result, they act as the basic “building-blocks” for the creation of other “higher” geographies, eg Datazones, council areas. The OAs are constructed by aggregating together a small number of postcodes. Because the OAs cover small areas and contain relatively small numbers of households and population (households in the range 20 to 77; population >/= 50), there is only a limited amount of Census data that can be released without infringing confidentiality. One of the main requirements during the creation of the 2011 OAs was to attempt to keep the 2011 boundaries the same as the 2001 OAs – this would make it easier to comparison over 10 years. There are 46,351 Census 2011 OAs in Scotland. Revisions and Corrections Revision to 2011 Output Area codes (13 September 2013) An anomaly was discovered in the 2011 Census Output Area (OA) codes which were published on 15 August 2013. The anomaly meant that, whilst all the current 2011 Census OA codes were unique, they did not always run in sequential order by council area. We decided to replace the codes with new ones that start at S00088956 and end with S00135306. Revision to Output Area boundaries at boundary between East Renfrewshire and Renfrewshire Council areas (7 October 2013) Output Areas S00102734, S00102787, and S00128636 have been amended following a correction to Ordnance Survey BoundaryLine. Correction to Output Area boundaries (7 October 2013) Output Areas S00092480, S00092699, S00093130, S00094559, S00094726, S00102583, S00119179, S00119262, S00126169, S00126157, and S00133403 have been amended as part of the cosmetic exercise/spatial improvement.

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    From 1845 to1930, civil parishes formed part of Scotland’s local government system. The parishes, which had their origins in the ecclesiastical parishes of the Church of Scotland, often overlapped the then existing county boundaries. Parishes have had no direct administrative function in Scotland since 1930. There are 871 civil parishes in Scotland. The initial version of the Civil Parish boundaries was first created by Geography Branch, GROS in the mid-1960s. The boundaries were plotted on to Ordnance Survey 1:10,000 maps using the written descriptions of the parishes. In the late 1980s the boundaries were digitised using the Geographic Information System, called “GenaMap”. In 2006, GenaMap was replaced by ESRI’s ArcGIS product, and the civil parish boundaries were migrated to the new system. In March-April 2009 many of the coastal postcodes were edited to improve their alignment with MasterMap’s coastal detail. As a result, in May 2009 some of the coastal parishes were edited to ensure that all postcodes’ Gridlink points would fall within the limits of the civil parish boundaries. In terms of provenance, the vast majority of the civil parish boundaries date back to their original drawing in the mid-1960s onto OS 1:10,000 maps.

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    A 2001 Standard (ST) ward is one of 2 special wards created for 2001 Census Output. These are both created by aggregating output areas and are only best-fit for electoral wards. Where 2001 Census Area Statistic (CAS) wards fall below the ST thresholds (400 households and 1,000 persons) they are merged with neighbouring CAS wards to exceed the threshold. It is also necessary to make a few adjustments to ST wards so as to remove and ‘slivers’ below ST threshold created by differencing ST wards and ST sectors. The processes result in 1,176 ST wards.

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    This dataset portrays the boundaries of ‘Settlements’ in Scotland as at 2001 Census. There is widespread interest in statistics for the built-up areas in Scotland as most of the population lives in a built-up environment. When the former two-tier local government structure of regions and districts came into being in May 1975, the small local authorities known as large and small burghs were lost. However, Census users stated that there was a need to know the population (and characteristics) of built-up areas. There are 2 datasets which are designed to show the boundaries of ‘urban areas’ in Scotland: ‘Localities’ and ‘Settlements’. While “Settlements’ can go a long way in defining the towns and cities in Scotland, some are very extensive and have grouped together some very large populations. For example the settlement of ‘Greater Glasgow’ has a large population but no breakdown was given of the settlement into any constituent towns or cities such as Airdrie or Paisley. Accordingly, since 2001, the larger ‘Settlements’ have been divided into ‘Localities’ using as a basis the areas so designated in the 1991 Census report ‘Key statistics for ‘localities’ in Scotland (ISBN 0-11-495736-3)’. For the 2001 Census, NRS had developed a new process to identify ‘Settlements’ which were defined as: ‘A collection of contiguous high population density postcodes whose total population was 500 or more, bounded by low density postcodes (or water).’

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    The geography of Scotland comprises the mainland plus many islands. Some of these islands are inhabited and through time their inhabited/uninhabited status can change. The prime reason for identifying inhabited islands was to aid the delivery and collection of Census questionnaires. If an island is inhabited, then Royal Mail will allocate postcodes to the island’s addresses. Many of the larger islands, with relatively large populations, will have postcodes that cover only the island. However, some of the smaller inhabited islands have very few households and in some cases the postcode for these island addresses is the same as that of some households on the mainland. In order to ensure that Census questionnaires are collected and delivered correctly, it is important that both parts of the postcode (the island addresses and the mainland addresses) are contained within the same Census Enumeration District. The identification of inhabited islands helps with the creation of meaningful Census Enumeration Districts. In addition to the enumeration aspect of the census, there has always been an interest in the statistics associated with Scotland’s inhabited islands and this dataset helps ensure that they are all identified. This “Inhabited Island” dataset was not rigorously maintained in the period between 2010 and 2012 and in January 2013 the dataset was re-established with some revisions.