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Biota

107 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 107
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    Blue-Green Algae Warning Notices for Lochs within The Highland Council Area

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    Locally important sites for wildlife or nature interests identified in the Argyll and Bute adopted Local Development Plan 2015. They have been judged to be important because: (A) the site supports a natural or semi-natural plant community(ies), and/or (B) the site supports a high diversity of floral species and contains uncommon/rare fauna, and/or (C) the site is of value for environmental education for local communities and local schools and/or (D) is a landscape, landform or rock feature identified as having a particular value for education and tourism Local Nature Conservation Sites include Local Nature Reserves, Regionally Important Geological/ Geomorphological Sites, former sites of important for nature conservation (SINC) and Other local wildlife sites

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    Trees, groups of trees, woodlands and areas of trees that have been afforded the statutory protection of a Tree Preservation Order.

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    Seal haul-out sites are designated under section 117 of Marine (Scotland) Act 2010. Harassing a seal (intentionally or recklessly) at a haul-out site is an offence. “Haul-out site” means any place which the Scottish Ministers, after consulting the Natural Environment Research Council, by order designate as such for the purposes of this section.

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    The dataset comprises polygons representing habitat compartments covering part of Aberdeenshire Council area and the whole of Aberdeen City Council area. Integrated Habitat System classifications were used to create habitat polygons using GIS mapping. Each polygon contains an Integrated Habitat System code representing a particular habitat type derived from UK Biodiversity Action Plan Broad Habitat types and UK Biodiversity Action Plan Priority Habitat types.

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    Regions of Provenance Great Britain is divided into four Regions of Provenance. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/INFD-72KLDL These are defined areas within which similar ecological and climatic characteristics are found. They provide a framework for specifying sources of Forest Reproductive Material (FRM). For native species, these Regions of Provenance have been split into a total of 24 non-statutory native seed zones. Seed zones are in turn divided where appropriate into two altitude zones, below 300m and above 300m. There is a different set of seed zones for native Scots Pine. Definitions of Origin and Provenance The origin of FRM describes that part of the natural range of the species from which the material originally derived. The term provenance is used to describe the location of the source from which the reproductive material was collected.

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    Location of surveys of severity of Invasive Species. Reporting on Hogweed, Knotweed and Balsam

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    Grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) are present around the coast of Scotland in internationally import numbers. They breed on wave-exposed rocky coasts, sometimes on sand or shingle beaches at the foot of cliffs, often on relatively remote islands, with large groups of pregnant females returning to traditional breeding sites in the autumn. This data shows the breeding colonies currently listed with the Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU).

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    Nephrops distribution is limited by the extent of suitable muddy sediment in which animals construct burrows. Nephrops are assessed across Europe as individual stocks in 34 functional units (FUs). This data combines the ICES functional units (based on ICES statistical rectangles), combined with the modelled extent of the muddy sediment in Scottish & adjacent waters, derived from sediment and VMS data.

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    In response to a 1980 select committee which recommended that ancient woods should be recognised and treated as a separate category, the NCCs compiled the Inventories of Ancient, Long-established and Semi-natural woodlands. A more sophisticated classification was developed for woodlands in Scotland due to the nature of the available historical sources. IMPORTANT. For Scottish woods, the category Ancient comprises woods recorded as being of semi-natural origin on EITHER the 1750 Roy maps OR the 1st Edition Ordnance Survey maps of 1860. This is due a) to the likelihood of the latter having been omitted from the Roy maps and b) to render the Scottish classification compatible with that for England and Wales.