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OGC:WMC

43 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 43
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    A Building Standards Register is maintained by local authorities under the terms of Section 24 of the Building (Scotland) Act 2003. Local authorities are responsible for granting permission for work to be done (building warrant) and for a completed building to be occupied (completion certificate). These registers are online and searchable and published as weekly lists in a similar way to planning applications. Registers typically contain details of applications at the following stages of the building warrant process: - Received - Decided - Commenced - Completed The datasets are presented as follows: 1. Building Standards - Weekly Lists (Points):  A point layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for all Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a local authority. This should be a complete dataset across Scotland using X/Y co-ordinates, UPRN or postcode as corresponding geometry. This is categorised by application status, local authority and date of weekly list. 2. Building Standards - Weekly Lists (Polygons): A polygon layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for most Scottish local authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a local authority. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online. This is categorised by application status, local authority and date of weekly list. 3. Building Standards - historic year layers (Polygons): Polygon layers for all previous year's building standards applications with summary details for most Scottish local authorities. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online and is not complete across Scotland. This data is collected and published weekly (for weekly lists) and this metadata record is updated weekly. *Moray's planning data has currently been removed from this dataset. We will find a solution to this in due course*

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    These strategies are a requirement that has now been added into the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/asp/2019/13/part/4/crossheading/forestry-and-woodland-strategy/enacted Most councils already have a FWS and these are normally accompanied by spatial data. Some of the strategies are produced jointly across Councils, e.g. Stirling & Clackmannanshire, Edinburgh & Lothians, Glasgow Clyde Valley. Generally, the FWS datasets contain similar attribution which identifies the FWS Classification, or the potential areas for woodland expansion. The attribution is usually along the lines of: Preferred, Potential, Sensitive, Unsuitable. Some of the councils have produced a few layers of data for their FWS which might apply specifically to woodland planting types, e.g. a separate FWS layer for native woodlands or for productive woodlands. Please note the data has been created using data of different scales (regional/local) and has been created as a high level assessment tool. The data should be viewed NO larger than 1:25000. Identification as a preferred area does not imply automatic approval of woodland planting proposals. Applications will be assessed based on site conditions. To be used in conjunction with the published supplementary guidance.

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    This web mapping service (WMS) contains all the layers held on Marine Scotland Maps (NMPi) portal, excluding any layers consumed from a third party WMS. Layers which are licensed only for the viewing via MS Maps may be hidden from the service.

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    Community councils are required to be established by local authorities. They are the most local tier of statutory representation in Scotland. They bridge the gap between local authorities and communities and help to make public bodies aware of the opinions and needs of the communities they represent. Community councils are statutory consultees under various processes, such as for planning applications. There are many instances where polygons do not tessellate or snap to local authority boundaries. The Spatial Hub processing can correct for some minor gap errors (<5m) but not larger ones. Such gaps in the dataset mean that it cannot potentially be used for some kinds of spatial analysis e.g. point in polygon, because some point locations may fall within the gaps. These gaps either require amendment at source or approval for the IS to change.

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    A ‘polling place’ is defined as the building or area in which a polling station will be located. A ‘polling station’ is the room or area within the polling place where voting takes place. Unlike polling districts and polling places which are fixed by the local authority, polling stations are chosen by the (Acting) Returning Officer for the election. The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places. The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.

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    A ‘polling district’ is a geographical subdivision of an electoral area such as an electoral Ward within which a polling place is designated. The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places. The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.

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    Regional Inshore Fisheries Groups (RIFGs) are bodies that aim to improve the management of Scotland's inshore fisheries (out to six nautical miles) and to give commercial inshore fishermen a strong voice in wider marine management developments. Originally six pilot IFGs were established in 2009 (covering the Outer Hebrides, the Clyde, the south east of Scotland, the north west, small isles and Mull, and Moray Firth) and each developed an inshore fisheries management plan for its area. This was followed in 2013 by six Inshore Fisheries Groups (IFGs) covering all of the Scottish coast (except Shetland which has its own management arrangements). The West Coast and North & East Coast RIFGs were established in April 2016 and replace the four IFGs that formerly covered the Scottish mainland coast. This layer shows the RIFG network, which includes the West Coast, North & East Coast and Outer Hebrides RIFGs, along with the Orkney Management Group and Shetland Shellfish Management Organisation.

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of data related to the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 and the new duties this places on local authorities. Part 5: Asset Transfer Requests: Provides community bodies with a right to request to purchase, lease, manage or use land and buildings belonging to local authorities. Local authorities are required to create and maintain a register of land which they will make available to the public. Part 8: Common Good Property: Places a statutory duty on local authorities to establish and maintain a register of all property held by them for the common good. It also requires local authorities to publish their proposals and consult community bodies before disposing of or changing the use of common good assets. Part 9: Allotments: It requires local authorities to take reasonable steps to provide allotments if waiting lists exceed certain trigger points and strengthens the protection for allotments. Provisions allow allotments to be 250 square metres in size or a different size that is to be agreed between the person requesting an allotment and the local authority. The Act also requires fair rents to be set and allows tenants to sell surplus produce grown on an allotment (other than with a view to making a profit). There is a requirement for local authorities to develop a food growing strategy for their area, including identifying land that may be used as allotment sites and identifying other areas of land that could be used by a community for the cultivation of vegetables, fruit, herbs or flowers.

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    This service contains layers with data from the National Coastal Change Assessment - Dynamic Coast project. The NCCA aims to establish historic coastal change by extracting the georectified coastline position from OS 2nd Edition Country Series maps (1892-1905) and to then compare it to both the 1970’s and current coastal position (updated by LiDAR datasets where available) in order to estimate past erosion/accretion rates. Using the historic coastal change rates the coastline position can then be projected into the future, albeit mediated by a Coastal Erosion Susceptibility Model (CESM) whose function is to limit erosion to areas where the hinterland is susceptible to erosion. The CESM is a national GIS assessment at 50 m raster resolution which models the physical susceptibility of the coast. The model uses a range of data (elevation, rockhead elevation, proximity to the coast, wave exposure, sediment accretion, and coastal defences) which are ranked and amalgamated into a single raster dataset reflecting erosion susceptibility. Using the erosion rates combined with a number of socioeconomic datasets, key assets at risk from future coastal erosion can be identified. The NCCA aims to inform existing strategic planning (Shoreline Management Plans, Flood Risk Management Planning, Strategic and Local Plans, National and Regional Marine Planning etc.) and to also identify those areas which may remain susceptible in the coming decades and require supplementary support. The identification of susceptible assets will enable the development of future management policies and adaptation plans robustly based on a strategic and objective evidence base.

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of all Scottish Community Asset Registers based (partly) on previous ePIMS submissions.