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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:625 000 providing a simplified interpretation of the geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Northern Ireland. Data are supplied as four themes: bedrock, superficial deposits, dykes and linear features (faults). Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy of the rocks. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Superficial deposits are younger geological deposits formed during the most recent geological time; the Quaternary. These deposits rest on older rocks or deposits referred to as bedrock. The superficial deposits theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with a geological name and their deposit-type or lithological composition. The dykes theme defines small, narrow areas (shown as polygons) of a specific type of bedrock geology; that is igneous rocks which have been intruded into the landscape at a later date than the surrounding bedrock. They are presented as an optional, separate theme in order to provide additional clarity of the bedrock theme. The bedrock and dykes themes are designed to be used together. Linear features data (shown as polylines) represents geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). All four data themes are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are delivered free of charge under the terms of the Open Government Licence.

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    The National Soils Inventory for Scotland (NSIS1) dataset has been collected using sampling points arranged as a 10 km grid. A wide range of attributes are described, measured and analysed for each site. These range from contextual information describing the surrounding landscape (such as slope and vegetation), down to detailed chemical analyses of each horizon within the soil profile. There are 721 sites in total where soil occurs; where there is no soil at a particular 10 km sampling point, this point has not been included.

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    INSPIRE Cadastral Parcels is a dataset maintained and produced by the Registers of Scotland to comply with the INSPIRE Directive. It is a sub-set of the Cadastral Map and contains the location of ownership polygons at ground level in Scotland. The polygons contained within the dataset are shapes that show the position and indicative extent of ownership of the earth’s surface for each registered property. Each cadastral parcel has a unique identifier called the inspire id that relates to a registered title on Scotland’s Land Register. The extent of rights and land contained within a title registered in the land register cannot be established from the cadastral parcel. For more detailed information on land and property data in Scotland you can search free at https://scotlis.ros.gov.uk/.

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    The data contains boundaries of Wild Land Areas in Scotland as determined by their level of naturalness, remoteness, ruggedness and lack of built modern artefacts. Boundaries should be considered as ‘fuzzy’ rather than definitive to reflect the transitional nature of wild land. It is an updateand replacementto the previously published Core Areas of Wild Land(CAWL)produced in 2013. Note that the areas have been renumbered sequentially and differ from those on the CAWL map.

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    SPAs in Scotland are classified by Scottish Ministers . These are areas of the most important habitat for rare (listed on Annex I to the Directive) and regularly occurring migratory birds within the European Union. SPAs are classified under the EC Birds Directive and together with SACs, form the Natura 2000 network. Proposed Special Protection Areas (pSPA) may be subject to change prior to classification.

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    Biogenetic reserves act as 'living laboratories' and are representative examples of various types of natural environment in Europe. They can consist of natural or semi-natural habitats and their selection is based on their value for nature conservation and protected status based on four criteria: 'typical', 'unique', 'rare' and/or 'endangered' which can be applied to habitats or species. The protected status must be adequate to ensure the conservation or management of the sites in the long term in accordance with fixed objectives.