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44 record(s)

 

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    Local Administrative Units (LAU) - Level 1 are part of the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) hierarchical classification of UK areas created by the European Office Statistics (Eurostat) in order to produce regional statistics which are comparable across the European Union. There are 3 NUTS levels moving from larger to smaller areas, NUTS 1 is Scotland, NUTS 2 divides Scotland into 4 areas and NUTS 3 divides Scotland into 23 areas. NUTS areas are stable and are only amended periodically. NUTS 4 and NUTS 5 have been superseded by Local Administrative Units (LAU), which were introduced in July 2003 as there was a requirement for statistics at local level which were compatible with NUTS. LAUs are amended to reflect administrative boundary changes. LAU boundaries were created by National Records of Scotland (NRS) from existing geographies. LAU Level 1 (formerly NUTS level 4) are Council Areas, Local Enterprise Companies (LECs) or a combination of both. Scotland is covered by 41 LAU1 areas.

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    The Scottish Government (SG) Urban Rural Classification provides a consistent way of defining urban and rural areas across Scotland. The classification aids policy development and the understanding of issues facing urban, rural and remote communities. It is based upon two main criteria: (i) population as defined by National Records of Scotland (NRS), and (ii) accessibility based on drive time analysis to differentiate between accessible and remote areas in Scotland. The classification can be analysed in a two, three, six or eight fold form. The two-fold classification simply distinguishes between urban and rural areas through two categories, urban and rural, while the three-fold classification splits the rural category between accessible and remote. Most commonly used is the 6-fold classification which distinguishes between urban, rural, and remote areas through six categories. The 8-fold classification further distinguishes between remote and very remote regions. The Classification is normally updated on a biennial basis, with the current dataset reflective of the year 2016. Data for previous versions are available for download in ESRI Shapefile format.

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    This dataset represents passenger and vehicle ferry ports in Scotland. These are the start and end terminals for the Scottish Ferry Routes dataset. It was initially created for use within the development of the Scottish Government's Urban Rural Classification. Ports which service both subsidised and private active ferry routes are included. Ferry ports and attributes are based upon route information obtained from Traveline data aggregated from operators (e.g. Caledonian MacBrayne, NorthLink Ferries, etc.).

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    The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) 2004 is the Scottish Government’s official tool for identifying concentrations of deprivation in Scotland. SIMD04 is the Scottish Government’s first edition. The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) combines seven different domains (aspects) of deprivation: income; employment; health; education, skills and training; geographic access to services; crime; and housing. These domains are measured using a number of indicators to form ranks for each domain. Data zones are ranked from 1 being most deprived to 6,505 being least deprived. Each of the seven domain ranks are then combined to form the overall SIMD. This provides a measure of relative deprivation at data zone level, so it tells you that one data zone is relatively more deprived than another but not how much more deprived.

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    16 Agricultural Area Offices provide local support for agricultural issues. This information then feeds into Agricultural Headquarters in Edinburgh.

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    The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) 2012 is the Scottish Government’s official tool for identifying concentrations of deprivation in Scotland. SIMD12 is the Scottish Government’s fourth edition since 2004. The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) combines seven different domains (aspects) of deprivation: income; employment; health; education, skills and training; geographic access to services; crime; and housing. These domains are measured using a number of indicators to form ranks for each domain. Data zones are ranked from 1 being most deprived to 6,505 being least deprived. Each of the seven domain ranks are then combined to form the overall SIMD. This provides a measure of relative deprivation at data zone level, so it tells you that one data zone is relatively more deprived than another but not how much more deprived.

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    Agricultural parishes are based on Civil Parishes which were abolished as an administrative unit in Scotland in 1975. Agricultural parishes continue to be used for boundary and statistical purposes. There are 891 agricultural parishes in Scotland and they are used in the Agricultural Census and for the payment of farming grants and subsidies. The dataset contains parish boundaries, parish names and parish codes.

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    The Police and Fire Reform (Scotland) Act 2012 dissolved the eight former police and fire areas in to a single service for all of Scotland. Following from this, a new organisational structure for Fire and Rescue Services was created comprised of seventeen Local Senior Officer Areas and three Service Delivery Areas. Local Senior Officer Areas are based on aggregations of Local Authority areas (defined by Ordnance Survey BoundaryLine), and remain in alignment with Local Authorities as these change.

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    The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) 2009 is the Scottish Government’s official tool for identifying concentrations of deprivation in Scotland. SIMD09 is the Scottish Government’s third edition since 2004. The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) combines seven different domains (aspects) of deprivation: income; employment; health; education, skills and training; geographic access to services; crime; and housing. These domains are measured using a number of indicators to form ranks for each domain. Data zones are ranked from 1 being most deprived to 6,505 being least deprived. Each of the seven domain ranks are then combined to form the overall SIMD. This provides a measure of relative deprivation at data zone level, so it tells you that one data zone is relatively more deprived than another but not how much more deprived.

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    Broad Rental Market Area (or BRMA) boundaries are used to determine Local Housing Allowance (LHA) rates. Empowered by the Welfare Reform Act (2007), the Rent Officer has defined the current boundaries in accordance with the Rent Officers (Housing Benefit Functions) (Amendment) Order 2008, which came into force on January 5th, 2009. The Order defines a BRMA as an area (a) comprising two or more distinct areas of residential accommodation, each distinct area of residential accommodation adjoining at least one other in the area; (b) within which a person could reasonably be expected to live having regard to facilities and services for the purposes of health, education, recreation, personal banking and shopping, taking account of the distance of travel, by public and private transport, to and from facilities and services of the same type and similar standard; and (c) containing residential premises of a variety of types and including such premises held on a variety of tenancies.