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  • Categories  

    The Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics, abbreviated as NUTS (from the French 'Nomenclature des Unités territoriales statistiques') is a geographical classification that subdivides territories of the European Union (EU) into regions at three different levels (NUTS 1, 2 and 3, respectively, moving from larger to smaller territorial units). At the local scale, two levels of Local Administrative Units (LAU) are also defined: LAU 1 and LAU 2 (formerly referred to as NUTS 4 and NUTS 5, respectively). NUTS areas aim to provide a single and coherent territorial breakdown for the collection, development, and harmonisation of EU regional statistics. Further, eligibility for aid from European Structural Funds (for those regions whose development is lagging behind) is assessed at NUTS 2 level. The NUTS classification was originally developed by Eurostat in the early 1970's, however, only gained legal status with Regulation (EC) No 1059/2003 which entered into force in July 2003. A first regular amendment ((EC) No 105/2007) replaced the 2003 version of NUTS with the 2006 version, enacted on 1 January 2008. The current classification is valid until December 31, 2011. For Scottish NUTS areas, the NUTS 1 region covers the whole of Scotland, whereas NUTS 2 subdivides Scotland into 4 regions, and NUTS 3 to 23 regions. Above NUTS 1 is the 'national' level of the EU Member State - the United Kingdom. For Local Administrative Units (LAU) there are currently 41 units at LAU level 1 and 1,222 at level 2. Codes for NUTS regions are prefixed by the characters 'UKM', where 'UK' identifies the member state, the United Kingdom, and 'M' indicates Scotland.

  • Categories  

    Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs) are areas within Scotland that contain surface water or groundwater that is susceptible to nitrate pollution from agricultural activities. They are designated in accordance with the requirements of the European Commision's Nitrates Directive 91/676/EEC, aims to protect water quality across Europe by preventing nitrates from agricultural sources polluting ground and surface waters and by promoting the use of good farming practices. The Scottish Government is responsible for maintaining and improving the quality of the aquatic environment, and carries out a review of the NVZ areas every four years. In 2016, five areas of Scotland were designated as NVZs under the following regulations: The Designation of Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (Scotland) Regulations 2014 (SSI 2014/373). The five NVZ areas were designated as nitrate levels from agricultural sources either resulted, or would likely result, in a concentration equal or exceeding 50 milligrammes of nitrate per litre of water in either surface water or groundwater. The five areas within Scotland, currently designated as NVZs, are: Aberdeenshire, Banff, Buchan and Moray, Strathmore and Fife, Stranraer Lowlands, Edinburgh, East Lothian and Borders, and Lower Nithsdale.

  • Categories  

    Data zone centroids are point features that represent the population weighted centre of data zones - the core geography used for the dissemination of results from Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics (SNS). Centroids were calculated from a population weighted sum of Census Output Area centroids that fall within a data zone. Eastings and northings for each Output Area were multiplied by their population, summed based upon the data zone in which they fell, and then divided by the total population of the data zone. These centroids are in turn used to link data zones to other (higher) geographies via a spatial join, producing a 'best-fit' match between data zones and other SNS geographies. This is Version 2 of the dataset, as the original version was shown to produce bias to the north and east. There are 6,505 data zones across Scotland, and each have been assigned an individual code that follows the Scottish Government's standard naming and coding convention. The code prefix is S01, which has been assigned to designate data zones. In some cases, data zones have also been assigned a name. To date, Local Authorities that have named their data zones include Eilean Siar (Western Isles), Falkirk, Fife, Highland, Moray, Shetland, South Lanarkshire, Stirling and West Lothian.

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    The Police and Fire Reform (Scotland) Act 2012 dissolved the eight former police and fire areas in to a single service for all of Scotland. Following from this, Police Division boundaries were defined to enable policing at the local level. Police Divisions are based on aggregations of Local Authority areas (defined by Ordnance Survey BoundaryLine), and remain in alignment with Local Authorities as these change.

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    The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) 2004 is the Scottish Government’s official tool for identifying concentrations of deprivation in Scotland. SIMD04 is the Scottish Government’s first edition. The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) combines seven different domains (aspects) of deprivation: income; employment; health; education, skills and training; geographic access to services; crime; and housing. These domains are measured using a number of indicators to form ranks for each domain. Data zones are ranked from 1 being most deprived to 6,505 being least deprived. Each of the seven domain ranks are then combined to form the overall SIMD. This provides a measure of relative deprivation at data zone level, so it tells you that one data zone is relatively more deprived than another but not how much more deprived.

  • Categories  

    The Scottish Government (SG) Urban Rural Classification provides a consistent way of defining urban and rural areas across Scotland. The classification aids policy development and the understanding of issues facing urban, rural and remote communities. It is based upon two main criteria: (i) population as defined by National Records of Scotland (NRS), and (ii) accessibility based on drive time analysis to differentiate between accessible and remote areas in Scotland. The classification can be analysed in a two, three, six or eight fold form. The two-fold classification simply distinguishes between urban and rural areas through two categories, urban and rural, while the three-fold classification splits the rural category between accessible and remote. Most commonly used is the 6-fold classification which distinguishes between urban, rural, and remote areas through six categories. The 8-fold classification further distinguishes between remote and very remote regions. The Classification is normally updated on a biennial basis, with the current dataset reflective of the year 2016. Data for previous versions are available for download in ESRI Shapefile format.

  • Categories  

    The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) 2012 is the Scottish Government’s official tool for identifying concentrations of deprivation in Scotland. SIMD12 is the Scottish Government’s fourth edition since 2004. The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) combines seven different domains (aspects) of deprivation: income; employment; health; education, skills and training; geographic access to services; crime; and housing. These domains are measured using a number of indicators to form ranks for each domain. Data zones are ranked from 1 being most deprived to 6,505 being least deprived. Each of the seven domain ranks are then combined to form the overall SIMD. This provides a measure of relative deprivation at data zone level, so it tells you that one data zone is relatively more deprived than another but not how much more deprived.

  • Categories  

    The Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics, abbreviated as NUTS (from the French 'Nomenclature des Unités territoriales statistiques') is a geographical classification that subdivides territories of the European Union (EU) into regions at three different levels (NUTS 1, 2 and 3, respectively, moving from larger to smaller territorial units). At the local scale, two levels of Local Administrative Units (LAU) are also defined: LAU 1 and LAU 2 (formerly referred to as NUTS 4 and NUTS 5, respectively). NUTS areas aim to provide a single and coherent territorial breakdown for the collection, development, and harmonisation of EU regional statistics. Further, eligibility for aid from European Structural Funds (for those regions whose development is lagging behind) is assessed at NUTS 2 level. The NUTS classification was originally developed by Eurostat in the early 1970's, however, only gained legal status with Regulation (EC) No 1059/2003 which entered into force in July 2003. A first regular amendment ((EC) No 105/2007) replaced the 2003 version of NUTS with the 2006 version, enacted on 1 January 2008. The current classification is valid until December 31, 2011. For Scottish NUTS areas, the NUTS 1 region covers the whole of Scotland, whereas NUTS 2 subdivides Scotland into 4 regions, and NUTS 3 to 23 regions. Above NUTS 1 is the 'national' level of the EU Member State - the United Kingdom. For Local Administrative Units (LAU) there are currently 41 units at LAU level 1 and 1,222 at level 2. Codes for NUTS regions are prefixed by the characters 'UKM', where 'UK' identifies the member state, the United Kingdom, and 'M' indicates Scotland.

  • Categories  

    The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) 2009 is the Scottish Government’s official tool for identifying concentrations of deprivation in Scotland. SIMD09 is the Scottish Government’s third edition since 2004. The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) combines seven different domains (aspects) of deprivation: income; employment; health; education, skills and training; geographic access to services; crime; and housing. These domains are measured using a number of indicators to form ranks for each domain. Data zones are ranked from 1 being most deprived to 6,505 being least deprived. Each of the seven domain ranks are then combined to form the overall SIMD. This provides a measure of relative deprivation at data zone level, so it tells you that one data zone is relatively more deprived than another but not how much more deprived.

  • Categories  

    Data zones are the key geography for the dissemination of small area statistics in Scotland and are widely used across the public and private sector. Composed of aggregates of Census Output Areas, data zones are large enough that statistics can be presented accurately without fear of disclosure and yet small enough that they can be used to represent communities. They are designed to have roughly standard populations of 500 to 1,000 household residents, nest within Local Authorities, have compact shapes that respect physical boundaries where possible, and to contain households with similar social characteristics. Aggregations of data zones are often used to approximate a larger area of interest or a higher level geography that statistics wouldn’t normally be available for. Data zones also represent a relatively stable geography that can be used to analyse change over time, with changes only occurring after a Census. Following the update to data zones using 2011 Census data, there are now 6,976 data zones covering the whole of Scotland.