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ESRI REST

44 record(s)

 

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  • Categories  

    The Scottish Government (SG) Urban Rural Classification provides a consistent way of defining urban and rural areas across Scotland. The classification aids policy development and the understanding of issues facing urban, rural and remote communities. It is based upon two main criteria: (i) population as defined by National Records of Scotland (NRS), and (ii) accessibility based on drive time analysis to differentiate between accessible and remote areas in Scotland. The classification can be analysed in a two, three, six or eight fold form. The two-fold classification simply distinguishes between urban and rural areas through two categories, urban and rural, while the three-fold classification splits the rural category between accessible and remote. Most commonly used is the 6-fold classification which distinguishes between urban, rural, and remote areas through six categories. The 8-fold classification further distinguishes between remote and very remote regions. The Classification is normally updated on a biennial basis, with the current dataset reflective of the year 2016. Data for previous versions are available for download in ESRI Shapefile format.

  • Categories  

    Local Administrative Units (LAU) - Level 1 are part of the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) hierarchical classification of UK areas created by the European Office Statistics (Eurostat) in order to produce regional statistics which are comparable across the European Union. There are 3 NUTS levels moving from larger to smaller areas, NUTS 1 is Scotland, NUTS 2 divides Scotland into 4 areas and NUTS 3 divides Scotland into 23 areas. NUTS areas are stable and are only amended periodically. NUTS 4 and NUTS 5 have been superseded by Local Administrative Units (LAU), which were introduced in July 2003 as there was a requirement for statistics at local level which were compatible with NUTS. LAUs are amended to reflect administrative boundary changes. LAU boundaries were created by National Records of Scotland (NRS) from existing geographies. LAU Level 1 (formerly NUTS level 4) are Council Areas, Local Enterprise Companies (LECs) or a combination of both. Scotland is covered by 41 LAU1 areas.

  • Categories  

    This dataset represents passenger and vehicle ferry ports in Scotland. These are the start and end terminals for the Scottish Ferry Routes dataset. It was initially created for use within the development of the Scottish Government's Urban Rural Classification. Ports which service both subsidised and private active ferry routes are included. Ferry ports and attributes are based upon route information obtained from Traveline data aggregated from operators (e.g. Caledonian MacBrayne, NorthLink Ferries, etc.).

  • Categories  

    Intermediate zone centroids are point features that represent the population weighted centre of intermediate zones - the geography used for the dissemination of results from Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics (SNS) that unsuitable for release at data zone level. Centroids were calculated from a population weighted sum of data zone centroids that fall within an intermediate zone. Eastings and northings for each data zone were multiplied by their population, summed based upon the intermediate zone in which they fell, and then divided by the total population of the intermediate zone. These centroids are in turn used to link intermediate zones to other (higher) geographies via a spatial join, producing a 'best-fit' match between intermediate zones and other SNS geographies. There are 1,235 intermediate zones across Scotland, and each have been assigned an individual code that follows the Scottish Government's standard naming and coding convention. The code prefix is S02, which has been assigned to designate intermediate zones. In most cases, intermediate zones were also been assigned a name by the relevant Community Planning Partnership. From time to time Local Authorities may choose to update these names, and this dataset will be updated to reflect these changes.

  • Categories  

    National Scenic Areas (NSAs) are Scotland's only national landscape designation, and defined as areas “of outstanding scenic value in a national context” for which special protection measures are required. The designation’s purpose is both to identify our finest scenery and to ensure its protection from inappropriate development. NSAs are broadly equivalent to the Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty found in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. They are regarded by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as Category V Protected Landscapes. There are 40 NSAs in total covering roughly 1 million hectares (13% of Scotland).

  • Categories  

    The Drinking Water Protected Area (DWPA) (Groundwater) dataset represents the individual groundwater water bodies in Scotland. These have been defined by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency in line with the requirements of The Water Environment (Drinking Water Protected Areas) (Scotland) Order 2013. The dataset is required to fulfil the requirements of the European Union Water Framework Directive.

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    Beach areas are designated under the Bathing Waters Directive (76/160/EEC) to protect the environment and public health at locations where bathing is not prohibited and is traditionally practised by a large number of bathers. The Directive requires that water quality at all designated bathing waters must meet specific microbiological requirements in order to protect the health of those that bathe there. The waters are designated on the basis of significant use, taking into account varying population densities and visitor numbers. There are currently 86 site designations contained in this dataset.

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    The fragile area dataset was digitised in 1998 on behalf of the Agriculture Department. There is no defintion of 'fragile' land for the context of this dataset. A fragility index has been applied to the LFA designation since 2003. This is part of the payment mechanism for lfass, it is set at parish level and changes from year to year. It is not known whether the fragile land and fragility index are linked.

  • Categories  

    European Structural Funds are a series of financial tools set up with the explicit purpose of reducing regional disparities across the EU in terms of income, wealth and opportunity. Scotland’s Structural Fund Programmes for 2014-2020 consists of 2 programme areas: Highlands and Islands (with a GDP between 75% and 90% of the EU average), and the rest of Scotland which is made up of the other three NUTS II (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics3) regions (North Eastern Scotland, Eastern Scotland and South Western Scotland) all of whom have a GDP above 90% of the EU average. The Highlands and Islands has been designated as a transition region and the rest of Scotland as a more developed region. The categorisation of the two areas has an impact on the type of projects that the funds can be used to support.

  • Categories  

    Intermediate zones are a statistical geography that sit between data zones and local authorities, created for use with the Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics (SNS) programme. Intermediate zones are used for the dissemination of statistics that are not suitable for release at the data zone level because of the sensitive nature of the statistics, or for reasons of reliability. Intermediate Zones were designed to meet constraints on population thresholds (2,500 - 6,000 household residents), to nest within local authorities (as they were in 2001), and to be built up from data zones. The aim was also to build intermediate zones by grouping together data zones with similar social characteristics, to have fairly compact shape and to take into account physical boundaries. Intermediate zones are a stable geography and can be used to analyse change over time. There are 1,235 intermediate zones across Scotland, and each have been assigned an individual code that follows the Scottish Government's standard naming and coding convention. The code prefix is S02, which has been assigned to designate intermediate zones. In most cases, intermediate zones were also been assigned a name by the relevant Community Planning Partnership. From time to time Local Authorities may choose to update these names, and this dataset will be updated to reflect these changes.