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    One of four component layer of the Scottish wildness map. This layer seeks to capture ruggedness: 'landform which is rugged, or otherwise physically challenging' (Annex 1 SNH policy statement). The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of ruggedness. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park.

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    One of four component layer of the Scottish map of relative wildness. This layer shows remoteness from the public road, rail and ferry network. The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of remoteness. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park. Remoteness is taken as the relative time taken to walk from the nearest public road, railway stationor ferry landing (being the point of mechanised access), taking account of distance, relative slope, ground cover and barrier features such as open water and very steep ground.

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    One of four component layer of the Scottish map of relative wildness. This layer shows perceived naturalness of the landscape. The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of naturalness. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park. Each different land class is given a 'naturalness score' from 1 (low perceived naturalness) to 5 (high perceived naturalness). For example built up areas and gardens are scored 1, arable and horticultural land are scored 2, calcareous grassland scored 3, acid grass scored 4 and bog scored 5. A focal statistics window of 250m is passed over the dataset averaging the naturalness values to account for surrounding areas.

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    One of four component layer of the Scottishmap of relativewildness. This layer shows the level of modern artefacts (detractors)that are visible. The dataset is on a scale of 1-256 indicating relative levels of visual influence. Consequently the data is best viewed at a national or regional scale. The methodology is adapted from the 2008 Wildness Study in the Cairngorms National Park. NextMap Digital Surface Model (DSM) gives the height of the surface including the detractors from which a viewshed can be produced. Viewsheds up to 15 km were created for 3 feature layersat 50m resolution, 1) Buildings and other structures, 2) Railway lines, roads and tracks and 3) Pylons and ski lifts. A fourth viewshed up to 30 km was created for wind turbineswhose heights were added to a DTM. The resulting calculations were then re-scaled 1-256 to produce the map of lack of built human artefacts.