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    Woodland Creation forms part of the Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) 2014 - 2020. The SRDP delivers Pillar 2 of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Utilising some £1,326m of European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development funding, plus Scottish Government match funding, it funds economic, environmental and social measures for the benefit of rural Scotland. The SRDP is co-funded by the European Commission and the Scottish Government and reflects the 6 EU Rural Development Priorities. The programme also reflects the Scottish Government National Policy Framework (NPF). The aim of the Forestry Grant Scheme woodland creation category is to support the creation of new woodlands that will provide a range of economic, environmental and social benefits which include: - delivery of the Scottish Government target to extend woodland cover by an additional 100,000 hectares over the period of 2012-2022 - climate change mitigation by tackling greenhouse gas emissions through carbon sequestration - restoration of lost habitats through developing forest habitat networks - underpinning a sustainable forest industry by providing a reliable timber supply - protecting the soil and water environment - providing community benefits through public access - enhancing urban areas and improving landscapes - supporting rural development through local businesses and farm diversification A fundamental consideration when creating new woodland is whether or not the tree species is appropriate to the site. You should carry out an appropriate site based assessment of soil and vegetation to match species choice with the particular site. Forestry Commission 'Ecological Site Classification' (ESC) decision support system helps guide forest managers and planners to select ecologically suited species to sites. ESC considers: windiness; temperature; moisture; continentality; soil moisture and soil nutrients. This helps to determine suitability of the chosen species to the site and identifies it as: poor; marginal; suitable or very suitable. In order to be considered for SRDP grant support the overall suitability for your chosen species must be either 'very suitable' or 'suitable'. As an initial first step in determining suitability, the polygons in this dataset represent the climatic suitability of the chosen tree species to the site. Climatic suitability, based on ESC uses the following climatic site factors: - Accumulated temperature - Moisture deficit - Exposure (Detailed Aspect Method Scoring [DAMS]) - Continentality NOTE: This datasets does NOT take into account any soils information. Any application that is identified on the map as being either 'unsuitable' or 'marginal' may still be considered - but only if you clearly demonstrate that the site is 'suitable' for the chosen species of tree (for example where there is localised shelter in an otherwise exposed location). The woodland creation category has nine options and the associated aims are: - 'Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is principally aimed at planting Sitka spruce. - 'Diverse Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is aimed at planting conifer species other than Sitka spruce. - 'Broadleaves' To create broadleaved woodlands on land that is suitable for sawn and prime timber and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). - 'Native Scots Pine' To create or expand native pinewood priority habitat (NVC) W18 - 'Native Upland Birch' The creation of native upland birch woodland of the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) W4: Downy Birch with Purple Moor Grass on shallow peaty soils. - 'Native Broadleaves' To create native broadleaved priority woodland habitats of the following National Vegetation Classification (NVC) types: W6 Alder with Stinging Nettle W7 Alder-Ash with Yellow Pimpernel W8 Ash, Field maple with Stinging Nettle W9 Ash, Rowan with Dogs Mercury W10 Oak (penduculate) with Bluebell Hyacinth W11 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bluebell/wild Hyacinth W16 Oak, Birch W17 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bilberry/Blaeberry - 'Native Low Density Broadleaves' To create specific native woodland or scrub habitats; including areas of ecotones for black grouse, treeline woodlands, juniper and other forms of scrub woodland and wood pasture systems. Normally associated with other woodland habitats in a transitional situation (eg. transition onto open hill: Black Grouse; Montane Scrub). - 'Small or Farm Woodland' To create small scale mixed broadleaved and conifer woodlands on farms and other rural land. - 'Native Broadleaves in Northern & Western Isles' To create native woodlands that contributes to the Orkney, Shetland or Western Isles woodland strategies. DATASET ATTRIBUTES: - Suitability - ie. 'Very Suitable', 'Suitable', 'Marginal', 'Unsuitable' or 'Inland Water'

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    Defining Scotland’s Places (DSP) aims to define the known extent of the archaeological sites and monuments in the National Record of the Historic Environment at Historic Environment Scotland, John Sinclair House, Edinburgh. The polygons created through Defining Scotland's Places do not carry ANY legal status. For instance they do not represent the legal extent of a Scheduled Monument or Listed Building.

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    The map shows the risk of the topsoil becoming compacted due to the passage of machinery. This map primarily covers the cultivated land in Scotland and provides information on the risk of topsoil compaction.The topsoil compaction risk gives information of the likelihood of the topsoil becoming compacted in 3 classes: High, Moderate or Low. The risk is based on the natural drainage class of the soil and the soil texture.

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    The map shows the risk of a bare soil being eroded by water under intense or prolonged rainfall and primarily covers the cultivated land in Scotland. Soils with mineral topsoils have been classified separately from those with organic (peaty) surface layers. The risk of soil erosion is shown in 3 main classes for soils with mineral topsoils; High, Moderate or Low. The risk of erosion is greatest on coarse textured soils with a low water adsorption capacity on steep slopes. Each main class is divided into 3 subclasses (H1-3, M1-3 and L1-3) with the greater numbers in each risk class indicating a higher risk of erosion due to increases in slope, soil textures becoming more coarse and/or the soils having a lesser ability to absorb rainfall. The risk of soil erosion for soils with organic (peaty) surfaces is also shown in 3 classes; High, Moderate or Low. The Moderate and Low erosion risk classes are divided into subclasses (Mi–iv and Li-iii) with the greater numbers (i-iv) in each risk class indicating a higher risk of erosion due to increases in slope and/or the soils having a lesser ability to absorb rainfall.

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    The map shows the vulnerability of subsoils to compaction by traffic. It covers most of Scotland’s cultivated agricultural land area. The subsoil compaction risk gives information on the likelihood of the subsoil becoming compacted due to heavy machinery in four classes (Extremely vulnerable, Very vulnerable, Moderately vulnerable or Not particularly vulnerable) based on the soil texture and the amount of water left in the soil after any excess has drained away (known as field capacity).

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    Land Cover Scotland (LCS) 1988 was the first ever national (air-photo) census of land cover in Scotland to describe the principal features and characteristics of the countryside. It was produced by The Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) on behalf of Scottish Government to assist in the development and monitoring of policies affecting the state of the Scottish countryside. It was intended that the 1988 LCS be used as a baseline for monitoring change. The classification system allows for 126 land cover types to be identified as point, line or area features. An important aspect of the classification system is that it allows for mosaics of the land cover types to be identified, where the pattern of cover types was so complex that individual types could not, at the selected interpretation scale, be separated. Over 1300 mosaics are identified in the LCS dataset.

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    The map shows the risk of potential pollutants and nutrients leaching through the soil to ground and surface waters. This map primarily covers the cultivated land in Scotland. The soil leaching potential gives information on the likelihood of a potential pollutant that is applied to the soil surface infiltrating the soil and leaching to a water course or ground water in three main categories (High, Intermediate and Low) with the High class being subdivided into 3 classes while the intermediate class is subdivided into 2 classes. Note: soils over current and restored mineral workings and in urban areas that are often disturbed or absent are assumed to have little ability to retain potential pollutants and so are classified as having a high leaching potential (see Lewis, M.A., Lilly, A and J.S. Bell. 2000. Groundwater vulnerability mapping in Scotland: Modifications to classification used in England and Wales. In: Groundwater in the Celtic Regions: Studies in Hard Rock and Quaternary Hydrogeology. Eds. N.S. Robins and B.D.R. Misstear Geological Society Special Publication No. 182. pp 71-79.).

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    This is the digital dataset which was created by digitising the Soils of Scotland 1:25,000 Soil maps and the Soils of Scotland 1:25,000 Dyeline Masters. The Soils of Scotland 1:25,000 Soil maps were the source documents for the production of the Soils of Scotland 1:63,360 and 1:50,000 published map series. The classification is based on Soil Associations, Soil Series and Phases which reflect parent material, major soil group, and soil sub-groups, drainage and (for phases), texture, stoniness, land use, rockiness, topography and organic matter. Phases are not always mapped. In general terms this dataset primarily covers the cultivated land of Scotland but also includes some upland areas . Not all of the available source documents have been digitised. Should there be a requirement for other areas to be captured, the Internal Contact should be contacted in the first instance. Attribute definitions: The attributes on each map (coverage) are specific to that map sheet, but in general terms the following categories are mapped: soil association, soil series, parent material, soil complexes, soil phases, skeletal soils, alluvial soils, organic soils, miscellaneous soils, mixed bottom land, built-up area, quarries/disturbed ground, collieries/bings, golf courses.

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    The Historic Land use Assessment (HLA) is a technique for helping understand the historic aspects of the landscape around us from an archaeological perspective. The HLA records the historical origins of the various components that make up the landscape, showing how they interrelate spatially and chronologically, and in doing so offers an insight into some of the processes that have created our modern landscape and enables us to recognise how features that survive from past events continue to influence the present. As such, the HLA is a key tool for understanding the historic landscape and complements other techniques of landscape assessment. In combination these enable a more holistic view of the landscape and its development over time to be achieved and approaches to landscape management and planning to be better integrated.

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    The map shows the risk of water flowing overland (runoff) carrying potential pollutants into water courses. This map primarily covers the cultivated land in Scotland. The digital dataset gives information on the likelihood of a potential pollutant applied to the soil surface running off the land to a water course in 3 classes: High, Moderate or Low and is based on fundamental soil characteristics such as depth to a slowly permeable layer, soil porosity and flow pathways through the soil.