Creation year

2020

37 record(s)

 

Type of resources

Categories

Topics

INSPIRE themes

Keywords

Contact for the resource

Years

Formats

Available actions

Representation types

Update frequencies

Service types

Scale

Resolution

From 1 - 10 / 37
  • Categories  

    Under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 a local authority may determine which parts of its area are of special architectural or historic interest and may designate these as Conservation Areas. The public will normally be consulted on any proposal to designate conservation areas or to change their boundaries.There are over 600 Conservation Areas in Scotland. Many were designated in the early 1970s, but some have since been re-designated, merged, renamed, given smaller or larger boundaries and new ones have been added. They can cover historic land, battlefields, public parks, designed landscapes or railways but most contain groups of buildings extending over areas of a village, town or city. Further planning controls on development can be made by way of an Article 4 Direction, which may or may not be associated with a Conservation Area. An Article 4 Direction is not a conservation designation but an additional control within such areas. It is a statement made under The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Scotland) Amendment Order 2011. The Direction, made by a local authority and approved by Scottish Ministers, removes all or some of the permitted development rights on an area. The effect of a Direction is that planning permission will be required for specific types of development which would otherwise be regarded as 'permitted development', i.e. development that does not require a planning application. Directions can cover a variety of minor works and might include: the replacement of doors and windows, the erection of gates, fences, garages, sheds, porches, storage tanks or the installation of satellite antennae. This dataset contains Conservation Areas, Conservation Areas with associated Article 4 Directions, Article 4 Directions associated with a Conservation Area, and a small number of discrete Article 4 Direction areas.

  • Categories  

    There are many areas where the scenery is highly valued locally and local authorities often give these landscapes a local designation. This is to ensure that the landscape is not damaged by inappropriate development, and in some cases encourage positive landscape management. These designations play an important role in developing an awareness of the landscape qualities that make particular areas distinctive and promote a community's sense of pride in their surroundings. The names used for such Local Landscape Areas currently vary from one local authority to another. For example, they are termed 'Areas of Great Landscape Value' in Moray, 'Special Landscape Areas' in Dumfries and Galloway, and 'Sensitive Landscape Character Areas' in Ayrshire. Guidance published by Scottish Natural Heritage and Historic Scotland (see below) suggests the name be standardised to Local Landscape Areas (LLA) now. LLAs complement the National Scenic Area designation, which identifies those landscapes that are seen as nationally important owing to their unsurpassed scenery. http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-landscape-areas/

  • Categories  

    Each local authority creates gritting routes and regimes to keep their most important roads (and in some cases footpaths) and networks clear come bad winter weather. Most LAs create these as line datasets. So the national dataset is a line format dataset. We now have two layers: one for road gritting and one for footpath. Some LAs collect this data as a polygon dataset. We are working with them to convert this into line formats in the future. We have removed trunk roads that are cleared by private companies e.g BEAR and AMEY from this dataset for the time being as they aren't currently under the LA gritting route regime. Eventually, the Street Gazetteer will enable us to identify these routes more accurately and coherently.

  • Categories  

    Land is legally defined as 'contaminated' where substances are causing or could cause significant harm to people, property or protected species as well as causing significant pollution to surface waters (for example lakes and rivers) or groundwater. Land can become contaminated by a variety of substances, from heavy metals to agricultural waste. The environmental, financial and legal implications of this can be substantial. The management and remediation of contaminated land that, in its current state, is causing or has the potential to cause significant harm or significant pollution of the water environment, is regulated by legislation and underpinned by the core principles of the 'polluter pays' and a 'suitable for use approach'. Local authorities are the primary regulator for the contaminated land regime (SEPA also has certain responsibilities within the scope of the legislation) to regulate activities and assist in the management and remediation of contaminated land. Contaminated Land can go through remediation work and this dataset attempts to collect that detail. However, when a site has been remediated, it becomes suitable for the current use (at the time of remediation), and that this doesn't mean the site is 'clean' or has no contamination. Further assessment/remediation may be required should there be any change of use or new planning application etc. The current regulation regarding Contaminated Land is contained within the Environmental Protection Act (1990) known as Part IIA. Part IIA is further established in Scotland by the Contaminated Land (Scotland) Regulations 2000 (SSI 2000/178), as amended and the Scottish Government’s Statutory Guidance: Edition 2 provides the detailed framework for the definition, identification and remediation of contaminated land. THIS SPATIAL DATASET IS ONLY CONFIRMED (AND REMEDIATED) CONTAMINATED LAND AND DOES NOT INCLUDE 'POTENTIALLY' CONTAMINATED LAND.

  • Categories  

    Local nature conservation sites (LNCS) is a non-statutory designation given by local authorities to areas of locally important nature and landscapes. Scottish Natural Heritage, on behalf of the Local Nature Conservation Sites Working Group, published guidance (http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-nature-conservation/) for local authorities on the establishment and management of LNCS systems in Scotland. One of the LNCS working group's recommendations was that all local authorities should adopt the LNCS name in place of the many different local names. However, many councils still use alternative names for these sites such as Local Biodiversity Sites, Local Wildlife Sites, Local Geodiversity Sites and Sites of Interest for Nature Conservation. We have merged these all into this national dataset. Several LAs are still to confirm and digitise their LNCSs.

  • Categories  

    'Development management' is the name given to the process of deciding planning applications and various other associated activities including enforcement of planning controls. For the purposes of planning applications, development in Scotland is put into one of three categories – 'local', 'major' or 'national'. The different categories mean that applications are treated in a way which is suited to the size and complexity of the proposed development and the issues they are likely to raise. Most applications will be for 'local' developments. 'Major' developments include applications for 50 or more homes, certain waste, water, transport and energy-related developments, and larger retail developments. 'National' developments are specific projects which have been identified in the National Planning Framework because of their national importance. Scottish Ministers become involved in a small minority of cases, but only do so where it involves a matter of genuine national interest. This dataset consists of 3 separate layers: 1. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Points):  A point layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for all Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This should be a complete dataset across Scotland using X/Y co-ordinates, UPRN or postcode as corresponding geometry. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list. 2. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Polygons): A polygon layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for most Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list. 3. Planning Applications - historic year layers (Polygons): Polygon layers for all previous year's planning applications with summary details for most Scottish planning authorities. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online and is not complete across Scotland. This data is collected and published weekly (for weekly lists) and this metadata record is updated weekly. *Moray's planning data has currently been removed from this dataset. We will find a solution to this in due course*

  • Categories  

    The Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Survey is a national data collection undertaken to establish the extent and state of vacant and derelict land in Scotland. The survey has been operating since 1988. This survey is associated with the Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Fund, under which cash allocations are made to local authorities. Every year the Scottish Government Communities Analytical Services produce a comprehensive national survey based on data collected and processed from all Local Authorities and Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority. The Spatial Hub takes this survey data and joins it (using site ID) to the polygon site information provided by local authorities. To create this dataset we have taken all of the spatial data provided by councils for the current survey year (2018 published in 2019) and combined it to this year's statistical survey (using the site reference). However: - where local authorities have not provided spatial data for the current year, their previous spatial data return has been used. - where there is no spatial data at all for sites we have buffered the easting and northing provided in the survey, to create a circular polygon area for a site. (Dumfries and Galloway Council and Highland Council)

  • Categories  

    Local nature reserves are areas of (at least) locally important natural heritage, designated and managed by local authorities to give people better opportunities to learn about and enjoy nature close to where they live. They are found across the country, but generally close to towns and cities. More details are available here: http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/lnr/ Where we have not been supplied with data by local authorities we are extracting it from a previously produced SNH national dataset.

  • Categories  

    SGN create 4 separate data layers (by pressure tier) to depict the location of their gas network: LP - Low Pressure (19 mbar - 75 mbar) MP - Medium Pressure (75mbar - 2 bar) IP - Intermediate Pressure (2 bar - 7 bar) HP - Regional High Pressure (>7 bar) The gas network data is up to date at the time of publication, but it is given without warranty as to the accuracy of the information shown. Service pipes, valves, siphons, sub-connections etc. are not shown but their presence should be anticipated. No liability of any kind whatsoever is accepted by SGN or its agents, servants or sub-contractors for any error or omission. Should the user wish to excavate in the vicinity of pipelines, the User should visit SGN via sgn.co.uk/Safety/Dig-safely for further information. SGN use an on-line mapping system, accessible via the sgn.co.uk/Safety/Dig-safely web pages or linesearchbeforeudig.co.uk, this process should be used to obtain up to date maps and safety information before you excavate. However if you need more information please contact our Safety Admin team on 0800 912 1722 or by email: plantlocation@sgn.co.uk. For the avoidance of doubt, safe digging practices, in accordance with HS (G) 47, must be used to verify and establish the actual position of mains, pipes, services and other apparatus on site before any mechanical plant is used. It is your responsibility to ensure that this information is provided to all persons (whether direct labour or contractors) working for you on or near gas apparatus. Mains shown in the data are those owned by SGN by virtue of being a licensed Gas Transporter (GT). Gas pipes owned by other GT’s, or third parties, may also be present in the area and are not shown in the data. Information with regard to such pipes should be obtained from the relevant owners

  • Categories  

    The Scottish Public Sector LiDAR (Phase 3) was initially captured by Fugro for Scottish Power Energy Network (SPEN) in 2015 and 2016 and to monitor their overhead power cable network under their Virtual World Asset Management programme. In addition, two pilots flights were included flown on behalf of the Scottish Border Council project Whiteadder in 2019. The Scottish Government procured this dataset with a contribution from SEPA for public use in 2019. This dataset covers total 11, 772 square kilometres (note the dataset does not have full national coverage). This dataset reflects the LAS point cloud data with density of 4ppm (points per square metre).