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    Local Authorities have a duty to designate any relevant areas where the air quality objectives are not (or are unlikely to be) being met as Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs). AQMAs must be designated officially by means of an 'order'. The extent of the AQMA may be limited to the area of exceedance or encompass a larger area. Following the declaration of an AQMA, the local authority is required to develop and implement a plan (Air Quality Action Plan) to improve air quality in that area. AQMAs can be for a combination of NO2, SO2, PM10. Most data provided by local authorities is in polygon format. However, some is provided in point and line form so we are currently buffering such data by the width of a road or so in order to merge them in to the national polygon dataset. Some smaller local authorities e.g. Dundee, use the entire extent of their local authority, as digitised in Ordnance Survey's BoundaryLine dataset, for the AQMA. We have included date of AQMA declaration in our national schema, though many LAs do not currently provide this. Revoked AQMAs are now held in this dataset with a 'Date revoked' attribute

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of data related to the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 and the new duties this places on local authorities. Part 5: Asset Transfer Requests: Provides community bodies with a right to request to purchase, lease, manage or use land and buildings belonging to local authorities. Local authorities are required to create and maintain a register of land which they will make available to the public. Part 8: Common Good Property: Places a statutory duty on local authorities to establish and maintain a register of all property held by them for the common good. It also requires local authorities to publish their proposals and consult community bodies before disposing of or changing the use of common good assets. Part 9: Allotments: It requires local authorities to take reasonable steps to provide allotments if waiting lists exceed certain trigger points and strengthens the protection for allotments. Provisions allow allotments to be 250 square metres in size or a different size that is to be agreed between the person requesting an allotment and the local authority. The Act also requires fair rents to be set and allows tenants to sell surplus produce grown on an allotment (other than with a view to making a profit). There is a requirement for local authorities to develop a food growing strategy for their area, including identifying land that may be used as allotment sites and identifying other areas of land that could be used by a community for the cultivation of vegetables, fruit, herbs or flowers.

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    Land is legally defined as 'contaminated' where substances are causing or could cause significant harm to people, property or protected species as well as causing significant pollution to surface waters (for example lakes and rivers) or groundwater. Land can become contaminated by a variety of substances, from heavy metals to agricultural waste. The environmental, financial and legal implications of this can be substantial. The management and remediation of contaminated land that, in its current state, is causing or has the potential to cause significant harm or significant pollution of the water environment, is regulated by legislation and underpinned by the core principles of the 'polluter pays' and a 'suitable for use approach'. Local authorities are the primary regulator for the contaminated land regime (SEPA also has certain responsibilities within the scope of the legislation) to regulate activities and assist in the management and remediation of contaminated land. Contaminated Land can go through remediation work and this dataset attempts to collect that detail. However, when a site has been remediated, it becomes suitable for the current use (at the time of remediation), and that this doesn't mean the site is 'clean' or has no contamination. Further assessment/remediation may be required should there be any change of use or new planning application etc. The current regulation regarding Contaminated Land is contained within the Environmental Protection Act (1990) known as Part IIA. Part IIA is further established in Scotland by the Contaminated Land (Scotland) Regulations 2000 (SSI 2000/178), as amended and the Scottish Government’s Statutory Guidance: Edition 2 provides the detailed framework for the definition, identification and remediation of contaminated land. THIS SPATIAL DATASET IS ONLY CONFIRMED (AND REMEDIATED) CONTAMINATED LAND AND DOES NOT INCLUDE 'POTENTIALLY' CONTAMINATED LAND.

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    'Development management' is the name given to the process of deciding planning applications and various other associated activities including enforcement of planning controls. For the purposes of planning applications, development in Scotland is put into one of three categories – 'local', 'major' or 'national'. The different categories mean that applications are treated in a way which is suited to the size and complexity of the proposed development and the issues they are likely to raise. Most applications will be for 'local' developments. 'Major' developments include applications for 50 or more homes, certain waste, water, transport and energy-related developments, and larger retail developments. 'National' developments are specific projects which have been identified in the National Planning Framework because of their national importance. Scottish Ministers become involved in a small minority of cases, but only do so where it involves a matter of genuine national interest. This dataset consists of 3 separate layers: 1. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Points):  A point layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for all Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This should be a complete dataset across Scotland using X/Y co-ordinates, UPRN or postcode as corresponding geometry. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list. 2. Planning Applications - Weekly Lists (Polygons): A polygon layer showing an amalgamation of the current calendar year's weekly lists for most Scottish planning authorities in terms of applications registered and/or decided by a planning authority. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online. This is categorised by application status, planning authority and date of weekly list. 3. Planning Applications (1996 - last calendar year): A polygon layer showing all previous year's planning applications with summary details for most Scottish planning authorities. This is only for authorities that publish site boundary mapping data online and is not complete across Scotland. This data is collected and published weekly (for weekly lists) and this metadata record is updated weekly. *DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE FILE, WE HAVE PREVENTED THE DOWNLOAD OF THE HISTORIC (1996 - LAST CALENDAR YEAR) LAYER. PLEASE USE THE WFS TO ACCESS. WE WILL WORK ON A MORE SUITABLE SOLUTION IN COMING MONTHS*

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    The Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Survey is a national data collection undertaken to establish the extent and state of vacant and derelict land in Scotland. The survey has been operating since 1988. This survey is associated with the Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Fund, under which cash allocations are made to local authorities. Every year the Scottish Government Communities Analytical Services produce a comprehensive national survey based on data collected and processed from all Local Authorities and Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority. The Spatial Hub takes this survey data and joins it (using site ID) to the polygon site information provided by local authorities. To create this dataset we have taken all of the spatial data provided by councils for the current survey year (2018 published in 2019) and combined it to this year's statistical survey (using the site reference). However: - where local authorities have not provided spatial data for the current year, their previous spatial data return has been used. - where there is no spatial data at all for sites we have buffered the easting and northing provided in the survey, to create a circular polygon area for a site. (Dumfries and Galloway Council and Highland Council)

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    Scheduled monuments are nationally important monuments and sites. The aim of scheduling is to preserve sites and monuments as far as possible in the form in which they have come down to us today. They are legally protected through the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979. National importance takes account of a wide range of factors, including artistic, archaeological, architectural, historic, traditional, aesthetic, scientific and social. Guidance and criteria to assess national importance of monuments is set out by Scottish Ministers in The Scottish Historic Environment Policy. This data allows you to identify the approximate position, size and extent of scheduled monuments in Scotland.

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    Compiled and managed by Historic Environment Scotland, Canmore contains over 320,000 records and 1.3 million catalogue entries from all its survey and recording work, as well as from a wide range of other organisations, communities and individuals who are helping to enhance this national resource.

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    This Web Feature Service combines all the spatial data available from Historic Environment Scotland.

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    Scottish Cultural ProtectedSites are INSPIRE compliant versions of Historic Environment Scotland designations and national monument records data. The Scottish Cultural Designations schema includes the following designation values: - Battlefield - Conservation Area - Garden and Designed Landscape - Historic Marine Protected Area - Listed Building - Scheduled Monument World Heritage Sites are included within the UNESCOWorldHeritage designation schema National Monument Records are included in the NationalMonumentRecord designation schema

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    The Listed Building Dataset comprises the statutory addresses and supplementary information for listed buildings in Scotland. Listing is the recognition through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 that a building or structure is of ‘special’ interest. Historic Environment Scotland lists buildings on behalf of Scottish Ministers.