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2019

48 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 48
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    In November 2004, Audit Scotland published a document entitled ‘Maintaining Scotland’s Roads’, effectively introducing a requirement on local authorities in Scotland to produce a Roads Asset Management Plan (RAMP). Following this publication, The Society of Chief Officers for Transportation in Scotland (SCOTS) produced a common asset management framework through which all local authorities could develop their own RAMP. Street assets/furniture are a key part of the RAMP and as such a requirement exists for a national dataset of information. This can include (although is not limited to) features such as bollards, road signs, barriers, parking bays, bus shelters, cattle grids, gates, street lighting columns, benches/seats, information boards, dog/litter/grit bins, cycle stands, ticket machines etc. etc. We are currently only including furniture types that have been provided by more than one council. These are: Grit Bins Street Lights Traffic Calming Traffic Signals Litter Bins Cattle Grids Weather Stations Dog Litter Bins Benches Bollards Picnic Tables Memorials Cycle parking We understand that some local authorities are loading this data into the VAULT system. We will work with the team managing that system to ensure that there is one definitive list in the future.

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    Local Authorities have a duty to designate any relevant areas where the air quality objectives are not (or are unlikely to be) being met as Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs). AQMAs must be designated officially by means of an 'order'. The extent of the AQMA may be limited to the area of exceedance or encompass a larger area. Following the declaration of an AQMA, the local authority is required to develop and implement a plan (Air Quality Action Plan) to improve air quality in that area. AQMAs can be for a combination of NO2, SO2, PM10. Most data provided by local authorities is in polygon format. However, some is provided in point and line form so we are currently buffering such data by the width of a road or so in order to merge them in to the national polygon dataset. Some smaller local authorities e.g. Dundee, use the entire extent of their local authority, as digitised in Ordnance Survey's BoundaryLine dataset, for the AQMA. We have included date of AQMA declaration in our national schema, though many LAs do not currently provide this. Revoked AQMAs are now held in this dataset with a 'Date revoked' attribute

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of all Scottish Community Asset Registers based on previous ePIMS submissions. It also includes data related to the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 and the new duties this places on local authorities. Part 5: Asset Transfer Requests: Provides community bodies with a right to request to purchase, lease, manage or use land and buildings belonging to local authorities. Local authorities are required to create and maintain a register of land which they will make available to the public. Part 8: Common Good Property: Places a statutory duty on local authorities to establish and maintain a register of all property held by them for the common good. It also requires local authorities to publish their proposals and consult community bodies before disposing of or changing the use of common good assets. Part 9: Allotments: It requires local authorities to take reasonable steps to provide allotments if waiting lists exceed certain trigger points and strengthens the protection for allotments. Provisions allow allotments to be 250 square metres in size or a different size that is to be agreed between the person requesting an allotment and the local authority. The Act also requires fair rents to be set and allows tenants to sell surplus produce grown on an allotment (other than with a view to making a profit). There is a requirement for local authorities to develop a food growing strategy for their area, including identifying land that may be used as allotment sites and identifying other areas of land that could be used by a community for the cultivation of vegetables, fruit, herbs or flowers.

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    Under Section 18 of the Clean Air Act 1993, many parts of Scotland are Smoke Control Areas. If you live in a smoke control area it is an offence to produce smoke from a chimney of a building, or a chimney of any fixed boiler or industrial plant, unless you're burning an authorised fuel or using exempt appliances (e.g. burners or stoves). In practice this means that in a smoke control area it is illegal to burn house coal or wood in an open fire, although it is legal to burn these in a stove or other appliance that has been approved to burn that fuel. It is also illegal to deliver any unauthorised solid fuels, e.g. wood and normal house coal, to any premises in a smoke control area unless the seller can demonstrate that they were aware that the unauthorised solid fuel is to be burnt in an exempt appliance.

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    Most councils will keep a record of their recycling and waste management facilities. Therefore we have tried to compile these into consistent national layers. Currently, we publish two layers: - Recycling Places (including locations of bins and centres) - a point layer (any provided polygons will have a centroid created) - Waste Management (including transfer centres and current/ historic landfill sites) - a polygon layer (any points will be buffered by 20m)

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    Each Local Authority should have a list of libraries within their Council area. These may be static i.e. located in one building all of the time, or mobile i.e. they are in vehicles that attend a set location on a specific day at a certain time. This data may also be collected as part of other datasets (e.g. Council Asset Register) though Local Authorities do appear to hold it as a distinct layer. Further information on Libraries in Scotland (inc. non-LA libraries) is available from The Scottish Library and Information Council (https://scottishlibraries.org/)

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    Planning applications for wind turbines with relevant planning application information. PLEASE NOTE that the same site can have more than one planning application related to it.

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    Under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 a local authority may determine which parts of its area are of special architectural or historic interest and may designate these as Conservation Areas. The public will normally be consulted on any proposal to designate conservation areas or to change their boundaries.There are over 600 Conservation Areas in Scotland. Many were designated in the early 1970s, but some have since been re-designated, merged, renamed, given smaller or larger boundaries and new ones have been added. They can cover historic land, battlefields, public parks, designed landscapes or railways but most contain groups of buildings extending over areas of a village, town or city. Further planning controls on development can be made by way of an Article 4 Direction, which may or may not be associated with a Conservation Area. An Article 4 Direction is not a conservation designation but an additional control within such areas. It is a statement made under The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Scotland) Amendment Order 2011. The Direction, made by a local authority and approved by Scottish Ministers, removes all or some of the permitted development rights on an area. The effect of a Direction is that planning permission will be required for specific types of development which would otherwise be regarded as 'permitted development', i.e. development that does not require a planning application. Directions can cover a variety of minor works and might include: the replacement of doors and windows, the erection of gates, fences, garages, sheds, porches, storage tanks or the installation of satellite antennae. This dataset contains Conservation Areas, Conservation Areas with associated Article 4 Directions, Article 4 Directions associated with a Conservation Area, and a small number of discrete Article 4 Direction areas.

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    Each local authority creates gritting routes and regimes to keep their most important roads (and in some cases footpaths) and networks clear come bad winter weather. Most LAs create these as line datasets. So the national dataset is a line format dataset. We now have two layers: one for road gritting and one for footpath. Some LAs collect this data as a polygon dataset. We are working with them to convert this into line formats in the future. We have removed trunk roads that are cleared by private companies e.g BEAR and AMEY from this dataset for the time being as they aren't currently under the LA gritting route regime. Eventually, the Street Gazetteer will enable us to identify these routes more accurately and coherently.

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    A ‘polling district’ is a geographical subdivision of an electoral area such as an electoral Ward within which a polling place is designated. The Representation of the People Act 1983 places a duty on LA to divide the local authority area into polling districts based on ward boundaries, and to designate a polling place for each district. LAs also have a duty to keep these polling arrangements under review. The Electoral Administration Act 2006 introduced amendments to the 1983 Act (which in turn has been superseded by The Electoral Administration Act 2013). Now local authorities must conduct a full review (with public consultation) of its polling districts and polling places every four years, however adjustments to the boundaries of polling districts and the designation of polling places within LA wards can be proposed at any time in response to changes in ward boundaries or to the availability of premises that can be reasonably designated as polling places. The Fifth Review of Electoral Arrangements concluded in May 2016 when the LGBCS made recommendations to Scottish Ministers for the number of Councillors and the electoral ward boundaries in each of Scotland's 32 local authorities. The review recommended changes in 30 LA areas of which all but 5 were accepted and came into force on 30th Sept 2016. As a result, ward boundaries (and therefore polling districts and possibly polling places) were changed after this date in time for the May 2017 elections.