cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

notPlanned

139 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 139
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    The 8 old operational areas in Highland (pre 2007): Badenoch and Strathspey; Caithness; Inverness; Lochaber; Nairn; Ross and Cromarty; Skye and Lochalsh; Sutherland;

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    Renewables Spatial Framework incorporating the Carbon and Peatland map as published by SNH on 30th June 2016

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    The 3 Operational Areas created in 2007 - - Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross - Inverness, Nairn and Badenoch & Strathspey - Ross, Skye and Lochaber

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    The data was collected for each of 27,915 one kilometre grid squares containing land in Highland Region.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as two themes: bedrock and linear features (faults), there is no superficial, mass movement or artificial theme available onshore at this scale. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. This means rock bodies are arranged into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    The map based index includes outlines for some 8,000 opencast coal prospecting sites dating from the 1940s until the mid 1990s. The index leads to information on the records of some 1 million boreholes (additional to those shown in the Borehole Records layer) drilled during site exploration and also the accompanying plans and other data, all filed in 3,618 boxes. The sites include those that have been drilled and not worked and also those that have been exploited. The original data, hardcopy maps, were received from the Coal Authority in 2001.

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    Digitised version of aeromagnetic survey records of Great Britain comprising a record for each digitised point, supported by survey and 'ends and bends' based line indexes. Original records include flight line records, worksheets, contour sheets and air photos provided by contractors at completion of each survey. Worksheets digitised by BGS during 1980's Smith and Royles 1989.

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    Vacant and Derelict Land Audit 2016 (Moray) The Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Survey is a data collection undertaken to establish the extent and state of vacant and derelict land in Scotland. The survey has been operating since 1988, and is managed by the Scottish Government Communities Analysis Division. The data is sourced from local authorities and the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority.

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    The Scottish Public Sector LiDAR (Phase II) dataset was commissioned in response to the Flood Risk Management Act (2009) by the Scottish Government, Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA), sportscotland, and 13 Scottish local authorities. This extension of the Phase I dataset collected airborne LiDAR for 66 additional sites for the purposes of localised flood management. Data was collected between 29th November 2012 and 18th April 2014 totalling an area of 3,516 km2 (note the dataset does not have full national coverage). Aside from flood risk management, this data has also been used for archaeological and orienteering purposes. This dataset reflects the Digital Surface Model (DSM) produced from the point cloud data.

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    Development Management Zones designated in the Argyll and Bute adopted Local Development Plan 2015. For the purposes of this plan the term settlement applies to the following development management zones: main towns and key settlements; key rural settlements, villages and minor settlements. Main towns are the settlements of Campbeltown, Dunoon, Helensburgh, Lochgilphead/Ardrishaig, Oban and Rothesay; the main towns constitute a development management zone wherein there is a general capacity to successfully absorb small, medium and large scale development. Key settlements is the collective term for six small towns and villages where the Argyll and Bute LDP seeks to focus employment-led investment and to concentrate larger scales of development opportunity. Key rural settlements is the collective name for 27 small settlements that offer a range of services and some potential for up to medium scale growth including delivery by masterplans or community led action. Villages and Minor Settlements are small, generally compact settlements containing at least 6 dwelling houses that constitute a development management zone wherein there is a general capacity to successfully absorb only small scale development.