cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

notPlanned

132 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 132
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    The map based index includes outlines for some 8,000 opencast coal prospecting sites dating from the 1940s until the mid 1990s. The index leads to information on the records of some 1 million boreholes (additional to those shown in the Borehole Records layer) drilled during site exploration and also the accompanying plans and other data, all filed in 3,618 boxes. The sites include those that have been drilled and not worked and also those that have been exploited. The original data, hardcopy maps, were received from the Coal Authority in 2001.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as two themes: bedrock and linear features (faults), there is no superficial, mass movement or artificial theme available onshore at this scale. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. This means rock bodies are arranged into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    Digitised version of aeromagnetic survey records of Great Britain comprising a record for each digitised point, supported by survey and 'ends and bends' based line indexes. Original records include flight line records, worksheets, contour sheets and air photos provided by contractors at completion of each survey. Worksheets digitised by BGS during 1980's Smith and Royles 1989.

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    The data was collected for each of 27,915 one kilometre grid squares containing land in Highland Region.

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    On 31 January 2011, Part 6 of the Marine (Scotland) Act 2010 came into force. Part 6 seeks to balance seal conservation with sustainable fisheries and aquaculture and its introduction means: It is an offence to kill or injure a seal except under licence or for welfare reasons, outlawing unregulated seal shooting that was permitted under previous legislation A number of seal conservation areas around Scotland will begin to be introduced, designed to protect vulnerable, declining common seal populations A new seal licensing system, providing a well regulated and monitored context for seal management in Scotland has been introduced. Seal Management Areas are: East Coast, Moray Firth, Orkney and North Coast, Shetland, South West Scotland, West Scotland, Western Isles.

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    The requirement to display sensitive areas relating to the life history of commercially important fish species in British waters is well recognized. Sensitive areas have previously been described as spawning and nursery grounds. Here we consider only areas where there is evidence of aggregations of 0 group fish and/or larvae of key commercial species. 0 group fish are defined as fish in the first year of their lives. These fish sensitivity maps were originally generated to provide a spatial and temporal description of where physical damage could potentially occur to fish species at sensitive stages in essential habitats of their life cycle. Sources of damage in this context referred to seismic surveying conducted by the offshore Oil and Gas industry during their site investigations. In addition to the acoustic energy that the seismic survey activities generate, we should now add other percussive impact noises from pile driving seabed foundation pins into the seabed, such as those required for offshore renewable energy sites. The spatial location of these fish life history events and their potential interaction with offshore industries can heavily influence the planning, costs and delivery of these offshore developments. It is imperative that these maps reflect the current extent of these areas.

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    The Scottish Coastal Forum was formed in 1996 to encourage debate at national level on coastal issues. Its members advise Marine Scotland, from an operational perspective, on the development of policy relating to marine planning and licensing within a sustainable marine environment. The Forum also provides a network for circulating information and best practice in coastal management amongst its own varied membership and the wider Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) community. Scotland has 7 Local Coastal Partnerships - • Coast Hebrides • East Grampian Partnership • Firth of Clyde Forum • Forth Estuary Forum • Moray Firth Partnership • Solway Firth Partnership • Tay Estuary Forum

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    The Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics, abbreviated as NUTS (from the French 'Nomenclature des Unités territoriales statistiques') is a geographical classification that subdivides territories of the European Union (EU) into regions at three different levels (NUTS 1, 2 and 3, respectively, moving from larger to smaller territorial units). At the local scale, two levels of Local Administrative Units (LAU) are also defined: LAU 1 and LAU 2 (formerly referred to as NUTS 4 and NUTS 5, respectively). NUTS areas aim to provide a single and coherent territorial breakdown for the collection, development, and harmonisation of EU regional statistics. Further, eligibility for aid from European Structural Funds (for those regions whose development is lagging behind) is assessed at NUTS 2 level. The NUTS classification was originally developed by Eurostat in the early 1970's, however, only gained legal status with Regulation (EC) No 1059/2003 which entered into force in July 2003. A first regular amendment ((EC) No 105/2007) replaced the 2003 version of NUTS with the 2006 version, enacted on 1 January 2008. The current classification is valid until December 31, 2011. For Scottish NUTS areas, the NUTS 1 region covers the whole of Scotland, whereas NUTS 2 subdivides Scotland into 4 regions, and NUTS 3 to 23 regions. Above NUTS 1 is the 'national' level of the EU Member State - the United Kingdom. For Local Administrative Units (LAU) there are currently 41 units at LAU level 1 and 1,222 at level 2. Codes for NUTS regions are prefixed by the characters 'UKM', where 'UK' identifies the member state, the United Kingdom, and 'M' indicates Scotland.

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    A Development Management Zone which, as designated in the Argyll and Bute adopted Local Development Plan 2015, comprises countryside and isolated coast which has extremely limited capacity to successfully absorb development; only limited categories of natural resource based development is supported in these areas

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    Data zone centroids are point features that represent the population weighted centre of data zones - the core geography used for the dissemination of results from Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics (SNS). Centroids were calculated from a population weighted sum of Census Output Area centroids that fall within a data zone. Eastings and northings for each Output Area were multiplied by their population, summed based upon the data zone in which they fell, and then divided by the total population of the data zone. These centroids are in turn used to link data zones to other (higher) geographies via a spatial join, producing a 'best-fit' match between data zones and other SNS geographies. This is Version 2 of the dataset, as the original version was shown to produce bias to the north and east. There are 6,505 data zones across Scotland, and each have been assigned an individual code that follows the Scottish Government's standard naming and coding convention. The code prefix is S01, which has been assigned to designate data zones. In some cases, data zones have also been assigned a name. To date, Local Authorities that have named their data zones include Eilean Siar (Western Isles), Falkirk, Fife, Highland, Moray, Shetland, South Lanarkshire, Stirling and West Lothian.