cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

notPlanned

132 record(s)

 

Type of resources

Categories

Topics

INSPIRE themes

Keywords

Contact for the resource

Years

Formats

Available actions

Representation types

Update frequencies

Service types

Scale

Resolution

From 1 - 10 / 132
  • Categories  

    The map based index includes outlines for some 8,000 opencast coal prospecting sites dating from the 1940s until the mid 1990s. The index leads to information on the records of some 1 million boreholes (additional to those shown in the Borehole Records layer) drilled during site exploration and also the accompanying plans and other data, all filed in 3,618 boxes. The sites include those that have been drilled and not worked and also those that have been exploited. The original data, hardcopy maps, were received from the Coal Authority in 2001.

  • Categories  

    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as two themes: bedrock and linear features (faults), there is no superficial, mass movement or artificial theme available onshore at this scale. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. This means rock bodies are arranged into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Categories  

    Digitised version of aeromagnetic survey records of Great Britain comprising a record for each digitised point, supported by survey and 'ends and bends' based line indexes. Original records include flight line records, worksheets, contour sheets and air photos provided by contractors at completion of each survey. Worksheets digitised by BGS during 1980's Smith and Royles 1989.

  • Categories  

    The data was collected for each of 27,915 one kilometre grid squares containing land in Highland Region.

  • Categories  

    Broad Rental Market Area (or BRMA) boundaries are used to determine Local Housing Allowance (LHA) rates. Empowered by the Welfare Reform Act (2007), the Rent Officer has defined the current boundaries in accordance with the Rent Officers (Housing Benefit Functions) (Amendment) Order 2008, which came into force on January 5th, 2009. The Order defines a BRMA as an area (a) comprising two or more distinct areas of residential accommodation, each distinct area of residential accommodation adjoining at least one other in the area; (b) within which a person could reasonably be expected to live having regard to facilities and services for the purposes of health, education, recreation, personal banking and shopping, taking account of the distance of travel, by public and private transport, to and from facilities and services of the same type and similar standard; and (c) containing residential premises of a variety of types and including such premises held on a variety of tenancies.

  • Categories  

    Woodland Creation forms part of the Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) 2014 - 2020. The SRDP delivers Pillar 2 of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Utilising some £1,326m of European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development funding, plus Scottish Government match funding, it funds economic, environmental and social measures for the benefit of rural Scotland. The SRDP is co-funded by the European Commission and the Scottish Government and reflects the 6 EU Rural Development Priorities. The programme also reflects the Scottish Government National Policy Framework (NPF). The aim of the Forestry Grant Scheme woodland creation category is to support the creation of new woodlands that will provide a range of economic, environmental and social benefits which include: - delivery of the Scottish Government target to extend woodland cover by an additional 100,000 hectares over the period of 2012-2022 - climate change mitigation by tackling greenhouse gas emissions through carbon sequestration - restoration of lost habitats through developing forest habitat networks - underpinning a sustainable forest industry by providing a reliable timber supply - protecting the soil and water environment - providing community benefits through public access - enhancing urban areas and improving landscapes - supporting rural development through local businesses and farm diversification A fundamental consideration when creating new woodland is whether or not the tree species is appropriate to the site. You should carry out an appropriate site based assessment of soil and vegetation to match species choice with the particular site. Forestry Commission 'Ecological Site Classification' (ESC) decision support system helps guide forest managers and planners to select ecologically suited species to sites. ESC considers: windiness; temperature; moisture; continentality; soil moisture and soil nutrients. This helps to determine suitability of the chosen species to the site and identifies it as: poor; marginal; suitable or very suitable. In order to be considered for SRDP grant support the overall suitability for your chosen species must be either 'very suitable' or 'suitable'. As an initial first step in determining suitability, the polygons in this dataset represent the climatic suitability of the chosen tree species to the site. Climatic suitability, based on ESC uses the following climatic site factors: - Accumulated temperature - Moisture deficit - Exposure (Detailed Aspect Method Scoring [DAMS]) - Continentality NOTE: This datasets does NOT take into account any soils information. Any application that is identified on the map as being either 'unsuitable' or 'marginal' may still be considered - but only if you clearly demonstrate that the site is 'suitable' for the chosen species of tree (for example where there is localised shelter in an otherwise exposed location). The woodland creation category has nine options and the associated aims are: - 'Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is principally aimed at planting Sitka spruce. - 'Diverse Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is aimed at planting conifer species other than Sitka spruce. - 'Broadleaves' To create broadleaved woodlands on land that is suitable for sawn and prime timber and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). - 'Native Scots Pine' To create or expand native pinewood priority habitat (NVC) W18 - 'Native Upland Birch' The creation of native upland birch woodland of the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) W4: Downy Birch with Purple Moor Grass on shallow peaty soils. - 'Native Broadleaves' To create native broadleaved priority woodland habitats of the following National Vegetation Classification (NVC) types: W6 Alder with Stinging Nettle W7 Alder-Ash with Yellow Pimpernel W8 Ash, Field maple with Stinging Nettle W9 Ash, Rowan with Dogs Mercury W10 Oak (penduculate) with Bluebell Hyacinth W11 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bluebell/wild Hyacinth W16 Oak, Birch W17 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bilberry/Blaeberry - 'Native Low Density Broadleaves' To create specific native woodland or scrub habitats; including areas of ecotones for black grouse, treeline woodlands, juniper and other forms of scrub woodland and wood pasture systems. Normally associated with other woodland habitats in a transitional situation (eg. transition onto open hill: Black Grouse; Montane Scrub). - 'Small or Farm Woodland' To create small scale mixed broadleaved and conifer woodlands on farms and other rural land. - 'Native Broadleaves in Northern & Western Isles' To create native woodlands that contributes to the Orkney, Shetland or Western Isles woodland strategies. DATASET ATTRIBUTES: - Suitability - ie. 'Very Suitable', 'Suitable', 'Marginal', 'Unsuitable' or 'Inland Water'

  • Categories  

    Scotland’s woodlands and forests are a vital national resource and play an important role in rural development and sustainable land use. As well as helping to reduce the impacts of climate change and providing timber for industry, our forests enhance and protect the environment and provide opportunities for public enjoyment. The Forestry Grant Scheme (FGS) will support: - the creation of new woodlands, contributing towards the Scottish Government target of 10,000 hectares of new woodlands per year - the sustainable management of existing woodlands WIG RESTRUCTURING REGENERATION - CLAIMS ========================================= This option aims to improve the biodiversity, resilience and species diversity of woodlands in the long term. This will be achieved through restructuring their age and species composition at the point of re-planting following felling. Restructuring Scotland’s woodlands will help deliver against the outcomes in the Scottish Forestry Strategy. Two grant rates are available: 1) Delivering UK Forestry Standard Woodland 2) Delivering Diversity and Resilience Woodland and there are two steps to determine whether your proposal will be eligible. Please use the URL link below for further details. The polygons in this dataset identify the spatial location of tree species grant aided under FGS and the planting year. All areas of grant aided open ground (OG) and non-grant aided other land (OL) are excluded from this dataset.

  • Categories  

    Woodland Creation forms part of the Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) 2014 - 2020. The SRDP delivers Pillar 2 of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Utilising some £1,326m of European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development funding, plus Scottish Government match funding, it funds economic, environmental and social measures for the benefit of rural Scotland. The SRDP is co-funded by the European Commission and the Scottish Government and reflects the 6 EU Rural Development Priorities. The programme also reflects the Scottish Government National Policy Framework (NPF). The aim of the Forestry Grant Scheme woodland creation category is to support the creation of new woodlands that will provide a range of economic, environmental and social benefits which include: - delivery of the Scottish Government target to extend woodland cover by an additional 100,000 hectares over the period of 2012-2022 - climate change mitigation by tackling greenhouse gas emissions through carbon sequestration - restoration of lost habitats through developing forest habitat networks - underpinning a sustainable forest industry by providing a reliable timber supply - protecting the soil and water environment - providing community benefits through public access - enhancing urban areas and improving landscapes - supporting rural development through local businesses and farm diversification A fundamental consideration when creating new woodland is whether or not the tree species is appropriate to the site. You should carry out an appropriate site based assessment of soil and vegetation to match species choice with the particular site. Forestry Commission 'Ecological Site Classification' (ESC) decision support system helps guide forest managers and planners to select ecologically suited species to sites. ESC considers: windiness; temperature; moisture; continentality; soil moisture and soil nutrients. This helps to determine suitability of the chosen species to the site and identifies it as: poor; marginal; suitable or very suitable. In order to be considered for SRDP grant support the overall suitability for your chosen species must be either 'very suitable' or 'suitable'. As an initial first step in determining suitability, the polygons in this dataset represent the climatic suitability of the chosen tree species to the site. Climatic suitability, based on ESC uses the following climatic site factors: - Accumulated temperature - Moisture deficit - Exposure (Detailed Aspect Method Scoring [DAMS]) - Continentality NOTE: This datasets does NOT take into account any soils information. Any application that is identified on the map as being either 'unsuitable' or 'marginal' may still be considered - but only if you clearly demonstrate that the site is 'suitable' for the chosen species of tree (for example where there is localised shelter in an otherwise exposed location). The woodland creation category has nine options and the associated aims are: - 'Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is principally aimed at planting Sitka spruce. - 'Diverse Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is aimed at planting conifer species other than Sitka spruce. - 'Broadleaves' To create broadleaved woodlands on land that is suitable for sawn and prime timber and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). - 'Native Scots Pine' To create or expand native pinewood priority habitat (NVC) W18 - 'Native Upland Birch' The creation of native upland birch woodland of the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) W4: Downy Birch with Purple Moor Grass on shallow peaty soils. - 'Native Broadleaves' To create native broadleaved priority woodland habitats of the following National Vegetation Classification (NVC) types: W6 Alder with Stinging Nettle W7 Alder-Ash with Yellow Pimpernel W8 Ash, Field maple with Stinging Nettle W9 Ash, Rowan with Dogs Mercury W10 Oak (penduculate) with Bluebell Hyacinth W11 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bluebell/wild Hyacinth W16 Oak, Birch W17 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bilberry/Blaeberry - 'Native Low Density Broadleaves' To create specific native woodland or scrub habitats; including areas of ecotones for black grouse, treeline woodlands, juniper and other forms of scrub woodland and wood pasture systems. Normally associated with other woodland habitats in a transitional situation (eg. transition onto open hill: Black Grouse; Montane Scrub). - 'Small or Farm Woodland' To create small scale mixed broadleaved and conifer woodlands on farms and other rural land. - 'Native Broadleaves in Northern & Western Isles' To create native woodlands that contributes to the Orkney, Shetland or Western Isles woodland strategies. DATASET ATTRIBUTES: - Suitability - ie. 'Very Suitable', 'Suitable', 'Marginal', 'Unsuitable' or 'Inland Water'

  • Categories  

    The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) 2012 is the Scottish Government’s official tool for identifying concentrations of deprivation in Scotland. SIMD12 is the Scottish Government’s fourth edition since 2004. The Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) combines seven different domains (aspects) of deprivation: income; employment; health; education, skills and training; geographic access to services; crime; and housing. These domains are measured using a number of indicators to form ranks for each domain. Data zones are ranked from 1 being most deprived to 6,505 being least deprived. Each of the seven domain ranks are then combined to form the overall SIMD. This provides a measure of relative deprivation at data zone level, so it tells you that one data zone is relatively more deprived than another but not how much more deprived.

  • Categories  

    Woodland Creation forms part of the Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) 2014 - 2020. The SRDP delivers Pillar 2 of the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Utilising some £1,326m of European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development funding, plus Scottish Government match funding, it funds economic, environmental and social measures for the benefit of rural Scotland. The SRDP is co-funded by the European Commission and the Scottish Government and reflects the 6 EU Rural Development Priorities. The programme also reflects the Scottish Government National Policy Framework (NPF). The aim of the Forestry Grant Scheme woodland creation category is to support the creation of new woodlands that will provide a range of economic, environmental and social benefits which include: - delivery of the Scottish Government target to extend woodland cover by an additional 100,000 hectares over the period of 2012-2022 - climate change mitigation by tackling greenhouse gas emissions through carbon sequestration - restoration of lost habitats through developing forest habitat networks - underpinning a sustainable forest industry by providing a reliable timber supply - protecting the soil and water environment - providing community benefits through public access - enhancing urban areas and improving landscapes - supporting rural development through local businesses and farm diversification A fundamental consideration when creating new woodland is whether or not the tree species is appropriate to the site. You should carry out an appropriate site based assessment of soil and vegetation to match species choice with the particular site. Forestry Commission 'Ecological Site Classification' (ESC) decision support system helps guide forest managers and planners to select ecologically suited species to sites. ESC considers: windiness; temperature; moisture; continentality; soil moisture and soil nutrients. This helps to determine suitability of the chosen species to the site and identifies it as: poor; marginal; suitable or very suitable. In order to be considered for SRDP grant support the overall suitability for your chosen species must be either 'very suitable' or 'suitable'. As an initial first step in determining suitability, the polygons in this dataset represent the climatic suitability of the chosen tree species to the site. Climatic suitability, based on ESC uses the following climatic site factors: - Accumulated temperature - Moisture deficit - Exposure (Detailed Aspect Method Scoring [DAMS]) - Continentality NOTE: This datasets does NOT take into account any soils information. Any application that is identified on the map as being either 'unsuitable' or 'marginal' may still be considered - but only if you clearly demonstrate that the site is 'suitable' for the chosen species of tree (for example where there is localised shelter in an otherwise exposed location). The woodland creation category has nine options and the associated aims are: - 'Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is principally aimed at planting Sitka spruce. - 'Diverse Conifer' To create conifer woodlands on land that is suitable for timber production and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). This option is aimed at planting conifer species other than Sitka spruce. - 'Broadleaves' To create broadleaved woodlands on land that is suitable for sawn and prime timber and that is accessible for timber transport (including links to suitable public roads). - 'Native Scots Pine' To create or expand native pinewood priority habitat (NVC) W18 - 'Native Upland Birch' The creation of native upland birch woodland of the National Vegetation Classification (NVC) W4: Downy Birch with Purple Moor Grass on shallow peaty soils. - 'Native Broadleaves' To create native broadleaved priority woodland habitats of the following National Vegetation Classification (NVC) types: W6 Alder with Stinging Nettle W7 Alder-Ash with Yellow Pimpernel W8 Ash, Field maple with Stinging Nettle W9 Ash, Rowan with Dogs Mercury W10 Oak (penduculate) with Bluebell Hyacinth W11 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bluebell/wild Hyacinth W16 Oak, Birch W17 Oak (sessile), Downy Birch with Bilberry/Blaeberry - 'Native Low Density Broadleaves' To create specific native woodland or scrub habitats; including areas of ecotones for black grouse, treeline woodlands, juniper and other forms of scrub woodland and wood pasture systems. Normally associated with other woodland habitats in a transitional situation (eg. transition onto open hill: Black Grouse; Montane Scrub). - 'Small or Farm Woodland' To create small scale mixed broadleaved and conifer woodlands on farms and other rural land. - 'Native Broadleaves in Northern & Western Isles' To create native woodlands that contributes to the Orkney, Shetland or Western Isles woodland strategies. DATASET ATTRIBUTES: - Suitability - ie. 'Very Suitable', 'Suitable', 'Marginal', 'Unsuitable' or 'Inland Water'