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Non-commercial Government Licence

31 record(s)

 

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    Scottish councils usually divide towns and country areas into catchments and children living in a catchment area will usually go to the same local school. Domestic properties typically have a catchment area for each of their local: - primary non-denominational (PN), - secondary non-denominational (SN), - primary denominational/ Catholic (PD) and - secondary denominational/ Catholic (SN) schools. This dataset contains four separate layers (representing those above categories), which we deliver together as one single web service or zip folder.

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    A council development plan may designate a green belt around a city or town to support the spatial strategy by: - directing development to the most appropriate locations and supporting regeneration; - protecting and enhancing the character, landscape setting and identity of the settlement; and - protecting and providing access to open space. This dataset has been developed as a polygon layer.

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    There are many areas where the scenery is highly valued locally and local authorities often give these landscapes a local designation. This is to ensure that the landscape is not damaged by inappropriate development, and in some cases encourage positive landscape management. These designations play an important role in developing an awareness of the landscape qualities that make particular areas distinctive and promote a community's sense of pride in their surroundings. The names used for such Local Landscape Areas currently vary from one local authority to another. For example, they are termed 'Areas of Great Landscape Value' in Moray, 'Special Landscape Areas' in Dumfries and Galloway, and 'Sensitive Landscape Character Areas' in Ayrshire. Guidance published by Scottish Natural Heritage and Historic Scotland (see below) suggests the name be standardised to Local Landscape Areas (LLA) now. LLAs complement the National Scenic Area designation, which identifies those landscapes that are seen as nationally important owing to their unsurpassed scenery. http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-landscape-areas/

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    In November 2004, Audit Scotland published a document entitled ‘Maintaining Scotland’s Roads’, effectively introducing a requirement on local authorities in Scotland to produce a Roads Asset Management Plan (RAMP). Following this publication, The Society of Chief Officers for Transportation in Scotland (SCOTS) produced a common asset management framework through which all local authorities could develop their own RAMP. Street assets/furniture are a key part of the RAMP and as such a requirement exists for a national dataset of information. This can include (although is not limited to) features such as bollards, road signs, barriers, parking bays, bus shelters, cattle grids, gates, street lighting columns, benches/seats, information boards, dog/litter/grit bins, cycle stands, ticket machines etc. etc. We are currently only including furniture types that have been provided by more than one council. These are: Grit Bins Street Lights Traffic Calming Traffic Signals Litter Bins Cattle Grids Weather Stations Dog Litter Bins Benches Bollards Picnic Tables Memorials Cycle parking We understand that some local authorities are loading this data into the VAULT system. We will work with the team managing that system to ensure that there is one definitive list in the future.

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of all Scottish Council Asset Registers. It also includes data related to the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 and the new duties this places on local authorities. Part 5: Asset Transfer Requests: Provides community bodies with a right to request to purchase, lease, manage or use land and buildings belonging to local authorities. Local authorities are required to create and maintain a register of land which they will make available to the public. Part 8: Common Good Property: Places a statutory duty on local authorities to establish and maintain a register of all property held by them for the common good. It also requires local authorities to publish their proposals and consult community bodies before disposing of or changing the use of common good assets. Part 9: Allotments: It requires local authorities to take reasonable steps to provide allotments if waiting lists exceed certain trigger points and strengthens the protection for allotments. Provisions allow allotments to be 250 square metres in size or a different size that is to be agreed between the person requesting an allotment and the local authority. The Act also requires fair rents to be set and allows tenants to sell surplus produce grown on an allotment (other than with a view to making a profit). There is a requirement for local authorities to develop a food growing strategy for their area, including identifying land that may be used as allotment sites and identifying other areas of land that could be used by a community for the cultivation of vegetables, fruit, herbs or flowers.

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    Local nature conservation sites (LNCS) is a non-statutory designation given by local authorities to areas of locally important nature and landscapes. Scottish Natural Heritage, on behalf of the Local Nature Conservation Sites Working Group, published guidance (http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting-scotlands-nature/protected-areas/local-designations/local-nature-conservation/) for local authorities on the establishment and management of LNCS systems in Scotland. One of the LNCS working group's recommendations was that all local authorities should adopt the LNCS name in place of the many different local names. However, many councils still use alternative names for these sites such as Local Biodiversity Sites, Local Wildlife Sites, Local Geodiversity Sites and Sites of Interest for Nature Conservation. We have merged these all into this national dataset. Several LAs are still to confirm and digitise their LNCSs.

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    Land is legally defined as 'contaminated' where substances are causing or could cause significant harm to people, property or protected species as well as causing significant pollution to surface waters (for example lakes and rivers) or groundwater. Land can become contaminated by a variety of substances, from heavy metals to agricultural waste. The environmental, financial and legal implications of this can be substantial. The management and remediation of contaminated land that, in its current state, is causing or has the potential to cause significant harm or significant pollution of the water environment, is regulated by legislation and underpinned by the core principles of the 'polluter pays' and a 'suitable for use approach'. Local authorities are the primary regulator for the contaminated land regime (SEPA also has certain responsibilities within the scope of the legislation) to regulate activities and assist in the management and remediation of contaminated land. Contaminated Land can go through remediation work and this dataset attempts to collect that detail. However, when a site has been remediated, it becomes suitable for the current use (at the time of remediation), and that this doesn't mean the site is 'clean' or has no contamination. Further assessment/remediation may be required should there be any change of use or new planning application etc. The current regulation regarding Contaminated Land is contained within the Environmental Protection Act (1990) known as Part IIA. Part IIA is further established in Scotland by the Contaminated Land (Scotland) Regulations 2000 (SSI 2000/178), as amended and the Scottish Government’s Statutory Guidance: Edition 2 provides the detailed framework for the definition, identification and remediation of contaminated land. THIS SPATIAL DATASET IS ONLY CONFIRMED (AND REMEDIATED) CONTAMINATED LAND AND DOES NOT INCLUDE 'POTENTIALLY' CONTAMINATED LAND.

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    Whilst TPOs are a legal requirement they may not always be digitised accurately. Users of this data should not assume this data is totally accurate and should consult the specific local authority for more detail before making any decisions A TPO is made by the Local Authority, under Section 160 of the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997, and within the procedures set out in the Town and Country Planning (Tree Preservation Order and Trees in Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Regulations 2010. They are made to protect individual trees, groups of trees or woodlands which have particular amenity value, make a significant contribution to the landscape or townscape or because there may be a potential threat to the trees. Deciding which trees qualify to become protected the local authority must ensure that the trees contribute to the amenity and attractiveness of an area and be under threat in some way. Either individual specimens or groups can be protected in a single Order. More information and guidance on Tree Preservation orders and Trees in conservation can be found in Planning Circular 1/2011. Which provides an overview of the TPO procedures, explaining how the requirements from the Act and Regulations fit together. Some local authorities capture polygons of tree preservation areas. Others will identify actual trees as point TPOs. Several LAs capture both. We have initially created two separate layers - point and polygon, to represent TPOs. This may show duplication where a point falls within a polygon. We may adapt this rationale and methodology in due course as we know that there is a discrepancy with Registers of Scotland's TPO data.

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    Local authorities are required to conduct an annual survey of the housing land supply, 'the Housing Land Audit', to determine completions within the timeframe and update forecasts of the housing land supply. This, in turn, helps inform land releases within the Local Development Plan process. A five-year effective housing land supply is required at all times.

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    The Water Intended for Human Consumption (Private Supplies) (Scotland) Regulations 2017 came into force in October 2017, and are regulated and enforced by Local Authorities. The main objective of the Regulations is to ensure the provision of clean, safe drinking water and to deliver significant health benefits to those using private water supplies. The DWQR has an independent role in verifying that the Regulations are complied with and also reports on compliance with the Regulations to the European Commission. Local Authorities are required to maintain a register of every private water supply to premises in its area.