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Non-commercial Government Licence

31 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 31
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    Town centres and other retail centres are defined by local authorities to meet the requirement of Scottish Planning Policy (paragraph 61) to identify town centres and other retail locations as part of a network of centres to support retail type development in the most appropriate locations. This network of centres forms part of the sequential test in assessing retail planning applications, which should be located firstly in town centres, then in other retail centres or edge-of-centre sites, so the dataset provides key locational information in assisting retail planning and policies. These centres may be defined in local development plans in the first instance.

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    Each Local Authority should have a list of libraries within their Council area. These may be static i.e. located in one building all of the time, or mobile i.e. they are in vehicles that attend a set location on a specific day at a certain time. This data may also be collected as part of other datasets (e.g. Council Asset Register) though Local Authorities do appear to hold it as a distinct layer. Further information on Libraries in Scotland (inc. non-LA libraries) is available from The Scottish Library and Information Council (https://scottishlibraries.org/)

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    Many Local Authorities capture locational details of certain safety features located across their area of jurisdiction. This dataset attempts to pull those features together into one single national dataset. It currently contains defibrillator, water access points, fire hydrant, lifebelt and CCTV locations where local authorities have provided them. It is likely that this dataset will be superseded and/ or conflated into a national emergency services gazetteer as and when that is created.

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    Scottish Planning Policy sets out the Scottish Government's policies in relation to economic development in Scotland. An Employment Land Audit is produced to monitor the supply, take up and status of employment land in line with National Guidance. The audit assesses the range and choice of marketable sites and locations for businesses with a variety of size and quality requirements. The audit identifies the availability and constraints of employment land sites within the local authority.

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    Many local authorities capture details of the cycle network within their jurisdiction. These maybe lanes along roads or segregated paths away from vehicles. This dataset attempts to pull these together into a national network.

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    Local authorities have the power to make by-laws to prohibit the drinking of alcohol in designated public places under provisions contained in the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (under sections 201, 202 and 203) subject to confirmation by Scottish Ministers. To date, 27 local authorities across Scotland have by-laws which prohibit the drinking of alcohol in designated public places in more than 480 towns and villages across Scotland, together with the built up areas within the city of Glasgow and Edinburgh have such by-laws. They range from a total ban on drinking at all times, to a ban at specified times or on specified days.

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    Whilst TPOs are a legal requirement they may not always be digitised accurately. Users of this data should not assume this data is totally accurate and should consult the specific local authority for more detail before making any decisions A TPO is made by the Local Authority, under Section 160 of the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997, and within the procedures set out in the Town and Country Planning (Tree Preservation Order and Trees in Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Regulations 2010. They are made to protect individual trees, groups of trees or woodlands which have particular amenity value, make a significant contribution to the landscape or townscape or because there may be a potential threat to the trees. Deciding which trees qualify to become protected the local authority must ensure that the trees contribute to the amenity and attractiveness of an area and be under threat in some way. Either individual specimens or groups can be protected in a single Order. More information and guidance on Tree Preservation orders and Trees in conservation can be found in Planning Circular 1/2011. Which provides an overview of the TPO procedures, explaining how the requirements from the Act and Regulations fit together. Some local authorities capture polygons of tree preservation areas. Others will identify actual trees as point TPOs. Several LAs capture both. We have initially created two separate layers - point and polygon, to represent TPOs. This may show duplication where a point falls within a polygon. We may adapt this rationale and methodology in due course as we know that there is a discrepancy with Registers of Scotland's TPO data.

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    Local authorities are required to conduct an annual survey of the housing land supply, 'the Housing Land Audit', to determine completions within the timeframe and update forecasts of the housing land supply. This, in turn, helps inform land releases within the Local Development Plan process. A five-year effective housing land supply is required at all times.

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    The Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Survey is a national data collection undertaken to establish the extent and state of vacant and derelict land in Scotland. The survey has been operating since 1988. This survey is associated with the Scottish Vacant and Derelict Land Fund, under which cash allocations are made to local authorities. Every year the Scottish Government Communities Analytical Services produce a comprehensive national survey based on data collected and processed from all Local Authorities and Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Authority. The Spatial Hub takes this survey data and joins it (using site ID) to the polygon site information provided by local authorities. To create this dataset we have taken all of the spatial data provided by councils for the current survey year and combined it to this year's statistical survey (using the site reference). However: - where local authorities have not provided spatial data for the current year, we have used their previous spatial data return and matched the survey data as best we can, - where there is no spatial data at all for sites we have buffered the easting and northing provided in the survey, to create the rough polygon area for a site.

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    This dataset is an amalgamation of licenced SEPA & some Local Authority Septic Tanks in Scotland. Under section 79 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and Under part 6, section 37 of the Water Resources (Scotland) Act 2013 SEPA, Scottish Water and Local Authorities all have a responsibility for the registration, management and compliance of Septic Tanks within Scotland. The Scottish Assessors also currently identifies 678 septic tanks. These are tanks that serve more than one dwelling. Those that serve just one dwelling may be treated as an appurtenance of the dwelling i.e. they are classified as domestic and treated as being reflected in the Council Tax band. SEPA have approximately a quarter of the Septic Tanks mapped as it has only been a requirement since 2012 that when buying or selling a house that these get licenced. Scottish Water have partial information (not included as data not provided in a suitable format) and Scottish Assessors collect some as well (not included due to percieved licensing restrictions). SEPA, Local Authorities, Scottish Water and Scottish Assessors are keen to combine data to create a complete and comprehensive view of all Septic Tanks in Scotland.