Carbon and Peatland 2016 map - Wind Farm Spatial Framework

Default

Title
Carbon and Peatland 2016 map - Wind Farm Spatial Framework
Date ( Publication )
Edition
Identifier
04ae7a7d-23e7-46e7-a4ba-da01c6823a97_resource

Abstract
This is a simplified version of the Carbon and Peatland 2016 map for use in the development of windfarm spatial framework. It only shows the extent of areas within Class 1 and 2 of the classification. To access the unabridged version, select the Carbon and Peatland 2016 dataset.Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) has prepared a consolidated spatial dataset of "carbon rich soil, deep peat and priority peatland habitats" in Scotland derived from existing soil and vegetation data (James Hutton Institute 1:25,000 and 1:250,000 scale soil data and Land Cover Scotland 1988). The resulting Carbon and Peatland map updated earlier work undertaken by SNH for the identification of natural heritage features of national importance available from Scotland's soil website. The map is a high-level planning tool to promote consistency and clarity in the preparation of spatial frameworks by planning authorities. The map is a predictive tool which provides an indication of the likely presence of peat on each individually-mapped area, at a coarse scale. The types of peat shown on the map are carbon-rich soils, deep peat and priority peatland habitat.

Custodian

Scottish Natrual Heritage - Patricia Bruneau ( Policy & Advice Officer / Soil Science )
Silvan House, 231 Corstorphine Road
Edinburgh
EH12 7AT
United Kingdom
notPlanned
GEMET - INSPIRE themes, version 1.0 ( Theme )
  • SoilMineral resourcesLand use
Use limitation
otherRestrictions
Other constraints
Available under the Open Government Licence Acknowledgment: Contains SNH information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.
vector
Distance
30
eng
Topic category
  • Geoscientific information
N
S
E
W
Reference system identifier
EPSG / ETRS89 (EPSG:4258) / 7.9

Reference system identifier
EPSG / OSGB 1936 / British National Grid (EPSG:27700) / 7.9

Reference system identifier
EPSG / WGS 84 (EPSG:4326) / 7.9

Distribution format
  • ESRI Shapefile ( 1.0 )

  • GML ( 3.2.1 )

  • KML ( 2.1 )

  • Mapinfo MIF/MID ( 4.5 )

dataset
Statement

Data are derived from the James Hutton Institute’s (and its predecessors, Macaulay Institute for Soil Research and Macaulay Land Use Research Institute) 1:250 000 Scale National Soil Data (revised version 2013) and 1:25, 000 scale Soils Data (part of Scotland) (revised version May 2016) to assess the carbon richness of soil and presence of deep peat and from the Land Cover Scotland 1988 (LCS88) data to define priority peatland habitats. The methodology built upon the approach published in SNH information note 318 for the categorization of carbon rich soil and Bruneau et Johnson (2011) to derived information on priority peatland habitat. Further information and access to all reports via SNH website http://www.snh.gov.uk/planning-and-development/advice-for-planners-and-developers/soils-and-development/ GIS methodology (simplified): 1- Creating a single soil layer with carbon attribute. Joins created between the 1:25k and 1:250k data and their respective tables. Add carbon class value 2- Reclassifying of LCS88 for priority peatland habitats and defined new Peatland_class based on relative distribution of primary and secondary habitats types. 3- Creating a join between above data using Carbon and Peatland lookup tables. What the map is: The map is a high-level planning tool to promote consistency and clarity in the preparation of spatial frameworks by planning authorities. The map is a predictive tool which provides an indication of the likely presence of peat on each individually-mapped area, at a coarse scale. The types of peat shown on the map are: • Carbon-rich soils • Deep peat • Priority peatland habitat Development Plans are expected to include wind farm spatial frameworks (paragraph 161 in SPP) – these should be informed by the Carbon and Peatland 2016 map (it maps the carbon-rich soils, deep peat and priority peatland habitat listed in Table 1 in SPP). Spatial frameworks can provide more than just an initial steer in the development plan. They can help to inform the scoping stage of an EIA and provide a framework for site selection, environmental assessment and decision-making. What the map shows: The map shows the areas of peat referred to in Table 1 in SPP – carbon-rich soil, deep peat and priority peatland habitat. In this simplified map, the top two classes (1 and 2) have been merged together to identify the nationally-important resource: Nationally important carbon-rich soils, deep peat and priority peatland habitat* Areas likely to be of high conservation value and areas of potentially high conservation value and restoration potential *Priority peatland habitat is land covered by peat-forming vegetation or vegetation associated with peat formation. For further details on these areas, please refer to the original Carbon and Peatland 2016. This dataset can also be found on NaturalSpaces. How the map could be used: The purpose of the map is to inform the preparation by planning authorities of spatial frameworks for onshore wind. It has been created to help provide a consistent approach across Scotland. The map provides planning authorities with the information they need to implement SPP. SPP requires PAs to develop spatial frameworks for onshore wind – and Table 1 in SPP sets out what should be shown in these spatial frameworks. Alongside other areas to be included, planning authorities are required to include carbon-rich soils, deep peat and priority peatland habitat – and to afford these areas significant protection, although this is not a ban on development. Although the map can only indicate that carbon-rich soils, deep peat and priority peatland habitat are likely to be present, it will be helpful in the initial site selection process undertaken by developers. The map should not be used in development management decision-making. A detailed site survey and EIA will be required. SNH’s guidance on spatial planning emphasises: ‘The location of a proposal in the mapped area does not, in itself, mean that the proposal is unacceptable, or that carbon rich soils, deep peat and priority peatland habitat will be adversely affected. The quality of peatland tends to be highly variable across an application site and a detailed assessment is required to identify the actual effects of the proposal.’ Spatial Planning for Onshore Wind Turbines – natural heritage considerations, SNH June 2015 http://www.snh.gov.uk/docs/A1663759.pdf The map should be used in conjunction with SNH guidance Spatial Planning for Onshore Wind Turbines – natural heritage considerations ( http://www.snh.gov.uk/planning-and-development/renewable-energy/onshore-wind/ ) Attribute definitions: OBJECTID - identifier IMPORTANCE - Carbon and Peatland class 1 and 2 merged – For all data For detail see part 3 of SNH Carbon-rich soils, deep peat and priority peatland habitat mapping - consultation analysis report (A1590738 – available from http://www.snh.gov.uk/planning-and-development/advice-for-planners-and-developers/soils-and-development/cpp/ )

gmd:MD_Metadata

File identifier
04ae7a7d-23e7-46e7-a4ba-da01c6823a97 metadataInXML
engdataset
Date stamp
Metadata standard name
UK GEMINI
Metadata standard version
2.2

Point of contact

Scottish Natural Heritage
Great Glen House, Leachkin Road
Inverness
IV3 8NW
United Kingdom